Tagged With nukes

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Hooray. If you live south of the Equator or in any of the countries that light up green in the map above, you're good. Keep on living there because you don't squat next to any nuclear weapons. But if you're in the countries painted red — like the United States, Germany, Russia, China, India and so on — you might live closer to a nuclear bomb than you think.

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A commercial diver working near Haida Gwaii off Canada's west coast has spotted a strange object on the seafloor that bears a striking resemblance to a nuclear device lost from a US B-36 bomber that crashed in the area 66 years ago. The Canadian government is sending naval ships to investigate.

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According to the US Geological Survey, a 5.3 magnitude "explosion" has been detected in North Korea near the country's only known nuclear test site. North Korea has claimed to have tested nuclear weapons after similar seismic activity in recent years, but none as large as today's event.

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Hey look, it's the scariest New York Times sentence you'll read in 2016: "The explosive innards of the revitalized weapons may not be entirely new, they argue, but the smaller yields and better targeting can make the arms more tempting to use — even to use first, rather than in retaliation."

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The nuclear bomb, that devastatingly powerful world killer of a weapon, has been around for 70 years. The first nuclear bomb — Trinity — was detonated in a test in New Mexico in 1945, a month later the US Army dropped nukes on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the world was never the same. Here's an interesting visualisation that shows every nuclear bomb that's been detonated on our planet.

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This video is more intense and more suspenseful and got me more scared than any movie I've watched this year. YouTuber Veritasium dug into the actual process involved in launching a nuclear missile from its silo and the retro-tech combined with its quaint fail safes and cute ignition all under the backdrop of the disastrous power of a nuke, makes for a truly captivating watch.

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There have been over 2000 nuclear explosions in real life, but if we believe the movies, it seems like every other action movie drops one in for added colour. And I totally get it. I hope to never see a nuclear bomb go off in person but I wouldn't mind seeing more explosive mushroom cloud visuals in my movies. They look so cool.

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Wiping out an American city, much less the largest ones, requires either blast yields well beyond the capability of any terrorist organisation, or numbers of nuclear weapons that would make the terrorist organisation one of the largest nuclear powers on the planet. This is particularly true of major cities such as Atlanta, Houston and LA, which are defined by their suburban sprawl.

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Among the few apocalypses worse than nuclear annihilation, asteroid impact has got to be near the top of the list — at least if Hollywood's depictions are any indication. Luckily, the American public has at least one agency defending it against errant space rocks: the exact same agency that's supposed to be protecting us from thermonuclear war in the first place.

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"EVERYBODY'S TALKING ABOUT SHELTERS" proclaimed Life magazine in its 12 January 1962 issue. Specifically, everybody was talking about nuclear fallout shelters, since both the United States and the Soviet Union had developed weapons which could unleash unimaginable destruction upon the Earth. The living might envy the dead if nuclear war broke out between the two superpowers, but where would the living live precisely?

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Today's modern art forger is capable of producing fake works of art so perfect that even trained experts are unable to spot them. Even down to the most minute details of the pigments, binders and canvass, these fakes are almost better than the works they're based on. But thanks to a byproduct of the Atomic age, the art world has a potent tool for finding forgeries.

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In the aftermath of the Second World War, it quickly became evident to the British government that Americans had no intention of sharing their newly acquired nuclear weapons technology despite the UK's assistance in the Manhattan Project. As such the British government set about building its own atomic arsenal which eventually led to the UK's worst nuclear meltdown in history.