Tagged With noaa

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When climate change is in the news, it's usually because of a scary new temperature record or a mass coral die-off, or because an enormous chunk of Greenland disappeared and nobody noticed. But at the end of the day, the thing that most of us really care about is how we'll be affected. Now, NOAA is making it easier than ever to find out, with a new Climate Explorer app that shows just how screwed (or spared) your little sliver of the country will be.

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Space may be called the "final frontier" but what about unexplored areas that are on our very own Earth? The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been using the Okeanos Explorer to document uncharted waters since 2010 and it's off to do it again, this time at the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument.

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FOR DECADES. . .THE US NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE. . . HAS ISSUED ITS FORECAST DISCUSSIONS IN SHOUTY CAPITAL LETTERS. . .USING FRAGMENTED SENTENCES. . .SEPARATED BY ELLIPSES. Yesterday it was announced that the National Weather Service will switch to mixed-case type and conversational language to provide a more user-friendly experience — and potentially save lives.

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Would you just look at him? Sprung to life out of a Pixar movie, the ghostly little fella pictured above was discovered last month by Deep Discoverer, the deep-diving robot that travels with NOAA's Okeanos Explorer. Spotted 4290m beneath the surface, it's the deepest observation of a so-called incirrate octopus ever, and it might be a new species.