Tagged With nintendo

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The Nintendo Entertainment System of the mid-1980s was a great home console, and 2016's miniaturised NES Classic Edition is a wonderful reimagining. You can buy one, too, as a Christmas present for yourself or your friends — after the first shipment sold out entirely, a second lot, likely the last for the year, is due in early December.

But you'll have to pre-order if you want one; the Classic Mini NES is going to be extremely hard to come by.

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The NES Classic Edition sold out everywhere in a matter of minutes yesterday. Nintendo has promised that more are on the way but that means you have to do things like wait and have patience. The internet is here to help. This video is a twofer. You can experience the vicarious joy of opening that sucker up and you can see what's in its guts just by clicking play.

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Nothing shaped my childhood more than Nintendo. Like millions of other little kids, I got a Nintendo Entertainment System for Christmas in 1988. It changed my life. At the age of six, the Nintendo was my first real "gadget," and it was love at first sight. I don't know if I would do what I do today without it.

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Nintendo, once drunk on the promise of touch screens and motion controls, has come to its senses. Four years later, the Japanese gaming giant is quietly taking its biggest mistake since the Virtual Boy off of life support.

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We've known for some time now that Nintendo's upcoming console would have portability baked in. The new product trailer for the Switch (formerly known by its project name NX) reveals that living room-to-pocket is just one of the options afforded to future owners of Nintendo's ambitious product.

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There's really nothing like playing a Nintendo 64 game with one of the classic controllers. The problem is that classic N64 controllers don't hook up to phones, tablet or laptops, which makes playing console emulators a real pain. Now, there's finally some sweet relief for retro gaming fans.

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Early consoles and home computers worked with extremely limited firepower. In those days, not only was the hardware less capable, there really wasn't room for expandability to make machines like the Commodore VIC-20 or Famicom more capable. Or wasn't there?