nanotechnology
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The World's Tiniest Light-Powered Engines Could Revolutionise Medicine

Nanomachines could revolutionise technology and modern medicine, if only we had viable power sources to make them move where we wanted them to go. Now scientists at the University of Cambridge have built the world’s tiniest engines, powered by light, as described in a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


New Nanowire Batteries Can Be Charged More Than 100,000 Times

Li-on batteries gradually deteriorate as they’re repeatedly drained and recharged. But now researchers from University of California, Irvine have developed a new nano-wire battery that can survive hundreds of thousands of charging cycles.


The Australian Nanoscience Institute Puts Every Experiment Inside A Faraday Cage

Nanotechnology researchers at the University of Sydney now have a building that will make them the envy of the scientific community — with ultra-clean rooms, vibration-free floors and faraday cages aplenty.


Australian Scientists Grow Nanostructures On Fabric, Now It Can Mop Up Oil Spills

Oil spills at sea, on the land and in your own kitchen could one day easily be mopped up with a new multipurpose fabric covered with semi-conducting nanostructures, developed by a team of researchers from QUT, CSIRO and RMIT.

“The fabric could also potentially degrade organic matter when exposed to light thanks to these semi-conducting properties,” says Associate Professor Anthony O’Mullane, from QUT’s School of Chemistry, Physics and Chemical Engineering, who collaborated with researchers from CSIRO and RMIT on this project.


How Medical Nanotech Will Change Humanity Forever

Futurists have long speculated that nanotechnology — the engineering of materials and devices at the molecular scale — will revolutionise virtually every field it touches, medicine being no exception. Here’s what to expect when you have fleets of molecule-sized robots coursing through your veins.


How Australian Scientists Are Driving Down The Cost Of Nanotechnology With Static Electricity

This time two years ago we still didn’t quite know how static electricity works. Now scientists have harnessed static electricity to control chemical reactions for the first time, in a breakthrough that could bring cleaner industry and cheaper nanotechnology.


Graphene Patterned After Moth Eyes Could Give Us 'Smart Wallpaper'

Tweaking the structure of graphene so that it matches patterns found in the eyes of moths could one day give us “smart wallpaper”, among a host of other useful technologies.


'Chopsticks Of Light' Reveal What Makes Spider Silk So Stretchy

Spider silk is nature’s Kevlar. It’s stronger than steel, it’s waterproof, and you can stretch it as much as 30 to 40 per cent before it snaps. Now biophysicists at Johns Hopkins University think they know the secret to spider silk’s remarkable elasticity: protein threads that serve as stretchy “superstrings”. The researchers describe their work in a recent paper in the journal Nano Letters.


This New Incandescent Bulb Uses Nano Mirrors To Match LED Efficiency

Energy-saving bulbs may have some competition in the shape of an ageing technology. Scientists have developed a new kind of incandescent light bulb that uses modern science to ramp up its efficiency, almost matching that of commercial LED bulbs.


Scientists Made A Battery That Could Keep Hoverboards From Exploding

Hoverboards won’t stop exploding lately, perhaps due to overheating batteries. But what if the battery could shut off before it got all hot and flamey? That’s the idea behind recent research at Stanford, and the benefits go far beyond gimmicky gadgets looking to avoid recalls.


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