Tagged With mushrooms

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Video: In Hungary there is a sweet Hungarian truffle that supposedly tastes like honey. I can't even begin to imagine how fantastic that is because truffles are already "the diamonds of the kitchen" and honey very well might be nature's greatest creation, so combining both in one is practically unfair. The truffle is used in dessert because of its sweetness but our friend Malackaraj shows us how to use it elsewhere.

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Crack open your dumb old phone, and you'll find lots of circuits and no lack of precious metals. In 100,000 mobile phones, it's estimated that there is 2.4kg of gold, more than 900kg of copper, 25kg of silver and more, according to Motherboard. Could a safer and and cheaper method of recovering that metal come by way of fungi?

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I was blown away when I first heard about a project that tried to tap into the electromagnetic communication potential of mushrooms. Using wires, radio waves and circuits — not psychedelics — the project's off-kilter quest to find (and listen to) "electromagnetic fungi" was nonetheless more art than science. But who says mushrooms have the right to remain silent?

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To grow mushrooms is to let things rot, so something's a lot of things are rotten in the US state of Pennsylvania. The Atlantic's deep dive into the dark side of truffles last week got us wondering about their more prosaic cousins: the portobellos and white buttons you find shrink-wrapped at the supermarket.

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Mushrooms may be most famous for their pizza prowess and psychedelic strains, but Paul Stamets, renowned mycologist and mushroom enthusiast, has much loftier visions for everyone's favourite fungi. He believes that the solution to some of the world's biggest problems lies in mushroom farming.

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We use polyurethane to make just about everything — garden hoses, furniture, the entirety of my local 99-cent store. It's easy to produce, durable, and dirt cheap. What it isn't is recyclable — there isn't a single natural process that breaks it down. That is until a newly-discovered Amazonian fungus takes a bite.

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Given the sense of horror I experienced when I dropped and shattered my iPhone 4 a few weeks ago, I wouldn't go anywhere with an iOS device unless it was safely ensconced in some form of case. And these iPad cases from Melbourne-based Etsy designer HoobyGroovy are my favourite cases ever.

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For some reason I can't seem to grasp, Japanese people seem to be obsessed with vibrating objects that are not actual vibrators. OK, I lied, I can understand it perfectly. Specially when they try to pass them as soft Super Mario mushrooms. Then I don't only understand the obsession, but I actually want to have one. In fact, buy two dozens and make a vibrating mushroom bed sticking them together. For $US26, you can use them as mini-seats and chair cushions, provided you don't weigh more than 80kg.

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Foraging for mushrooms can be fun, but getting poisoned by the wrong species always ruins a nice afternoon. Researchers at the Hagenberg College in Austria have developed software that can identify which mushrooms are safe to eat and which are poisonous, just from a photograph. This means it could easily be run on a mobile phone with a camera, to create a handy tool for foragers. It's not sure yet clear whether magic mushrooms have been placed in the safe or poisonous category - maybe that will be a user option.