Tagged With mozilla

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Mozilla has a new logo, the latest in the company's effort to rebrand itself as a modern technology outfit worthy of your attention. It's no surprise that the company reaching to stay relevant in the face of plunging usage of its key product, the internet browser Firefox. Somewhere out there is a designer who still uses Adobe Pagemaker and is very proud of their work on this logo. The rest of us are wondering where the hell the Mozilla we used to know has gone.

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The internet is a constantly changing place. There's no guarantee a page that existed a few years — or even days — ago will remain that way. Depending on how desperate you are, you can always give Google's web cache or the Wayback Machine a go, but wouldn't it be nice if your browser did this for you? Mozilla thinks so.

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Writing scripts for a popular TV show sounds like a dream job for any budding Hollywood hopeful. The hard part is getting someone to read what you put to paper. Of course, if you happen to be Blake Ross, co-founder of a little browser called Firefox, it gets a whole lot easier, particularly if that script happens to be for HBO's Silicon Valley. Warning: spoilers ahead!

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Building extensible software is a tricky business. On one hand, you want your platform to be as customisable as possible, while on the other you want the flexibility to update APIs to make them faster, more secure and feature-rich. These aims aren't always compatible, as we're now discovering with Mozilla and the fundamental changes it's making to Firefox's add-on infrastructure.

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Mozilla knows what's up. The non-profit is aware that the vast majority of its users think that privacy on the internet is falling apart, so it's launching a new strategic privacy initiative called Polaris. And you'll never guess who's on board. Just kidding, it's totally obvious: the Tor Project.

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It's official: the last holdout for the open web has fallen. Flanked on all sides by Google, Microsoft, Opera, and (it appears) Safari's support and promotion of the EME DRM-in-HTML standard, Mozilla is giving in to pressure from Hollywood, Netflix, et al, and will be implementing its own third-party version of DRM. It will be rolled out in Desktop Firefox later this year.