Tagged With moon

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Last night, photographers around the world turned their cameras to the sky to capture the closest full moon — also known as a supermoon — since 1948. We've scoured the web to bring you some of our favourite photos of the celestial event that took our minds off the current state of world affairs for a few blissful minutes.

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Entire lifetimes have come and gone without the moon looking quite as large as it will this month. On November 14, skygazers will witness the closest full moon, or "supermoon", of 2016. But more excitingly, it will be the closest full moon since 1948 - and we won't get another one like it until 2034.

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Bad news, would-be lunar colonists: That dusty, airless space rock you dream of escaping to is apparently swarming with deadly projectiles. According to a new study, Earth's nearest neighbour is being bombarded by small, fast-moving chunks of debris, at a rate 100 times faster than impact models previously estimated.

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The moon is our almost constant frenemy in space, lighting our nights and spoiling our star-views in equal turns. But now, new measurements from Apollo-era moon rocks suggest that the moon and Earth had a much more savage past than we knew.

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Video: If you want to go to the Moon, you can either hitch your ride with NASA and SpaceX or you can get yourself a camera with an incredible zoom like the Nikon P900 which comes with a 24-2000mm lens that can rip off an 83x optical zoom. All you gotta do is point the camera to the sky, lock in on the Moon, and basically have it bring you there, no spaceship required.

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Four billion years ago, an endless barrage of space rock pummelled the surface of the Earth and the Moon, in a period known as the Late Heavy Bombardment. Now, astronomers have performed a detailed analysis of one of the most famous craters from that time, and what they have learned could rewrite the most violent chapter in Earth's history.

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On 11 December 1972, Apollo 17 touched down on the Moon. This was not only our final Moon landing, but the last time we left low Earth orbit. With the successful launch of the Orion capsule, NASA is finally poised to go further again. So it's important to remember how we got to the Moon — and why we stopped going.