Tagged With military

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Video: You know that queasy feeling you get in your stomach when the pilot of a large passenger plane has to make a rough landing in bad weather? Just try and imagine what this Royal Danish Air Force pilot was feeling while trying to land a Seahawk MH-60R helicopter on a boat while both were being tossed around in a North Atlantic storm.

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Ever since NORAD's Cheyenne Mountain underground facility became fully operational in 1966, it's been America's command and control centre for the nuclear apocalypse. But photos from inside the top secret bunker, even historical ones, are incredibly rare. Yesterday the folks over at Memory Hole 2 helped make them a bit less rare by uploading some hard-to-find NORAD photos published in 1970.

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On 23 May 1967, the United States Air Force scrambled to ready nuclear missile-laden aircraft for deployment. Radar systems designed to detect incoming Soviet missiles had just been disrupted, in what the military perceived to be an act of war. But before any nukes were launched in retaliation, it seems Air Force command was told to stand down.

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Here's an E-2C Hawkeye trying to land on the USS Eisenhower. Everything seems normal until the arresting cable on the carrier — which is supposed to snare an aircraft as it lands — suddenly snaps. The aeroplane almost looks like a runaway car until it drops and disappears out of view, off the carrier. Luckily, the aircraft managed to fly back up in time to avoid diving into the ocean.

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Video: Few movie scenes capture the horror of war like Saving Private Ryan. Seeing the storming of the beach in all its ugliness — the fear, the seasickness, the bullets, the desperation, the death — gives us a cold look at the reality of D-Day and how terrifying it must have been. But just how historically accurate is that scene? History Buffs analyses scenes from Saving Private Ryan to point out what actually happened versus what is Hollywood fiction.

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Long a staple of science fiction, the idea of creating weapons that can disrupt or alter the cognitive processes of enemy combatants is starting to become reality. Inspired by recent advances in neuroscience, the U.S. military is considering the potential for "neuro-cognitive weapons". Here's what you need to know about this fascinating and frightening prospect.