Tagged With medicine

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Neuroscienitsts have generally thought that babies are born with more tissue than their brains need, and that the body slowly dumps some of it as the brain develops. However, a new study shows that at least one part of the brain — the part that recognises faces — appears to develop in the opposite direction, increasing in complexity into adulthood.

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On January 1, a set of long-awaited FDA rules went into effect that could mark a major shift in the agency's approach to antibiotics for livestock animals. First, the new US policies place an outright ban on the use of any antibiotics considered "medically important" to help animals gain weight. The rules also require that such drugs only be given to animals under the supervision of a veterinarian, when animals are actually ill.

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For years, men suffering from erectile dysfunction were told to reach for the little blue pill. But if that fails, what's left? An inventive application of elastic "memory metal" is being used to create a penile implant to help men regain control of their bodies. 2016: Shitty year for everyone else, actually not a bad year for dicks.

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Usually, the only thing I can tell from another person's breath is whether they're drunk (or the last time they have brushed their teeth). But an international team of scientists has created a system that can diagnose disease solely from the chemicals you exhale. A disease fingerprint for your breath. A breathprint of death. A deathprint.

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The movement against vaccinating children has, for the most part, been dismissed by pretty much anyone who matters as a bunch of fringe theorists. While there is no credible evidence that vaccines cause autism, as anti-vaccine activists say they do, there is plenty of evidence that vaccines prevent epidemics of horrible, deadly diseases.

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The next time you go in for surgery, you might come out thanking a crab. New research from the Harvard Wyss Institute shows that chitosan, a fancy term for crustacean goo, can be used as a biodegradable glue to heal wounds and patch surgical incisions.

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US president-elect Donald Trump has nominated Tom Price to lead the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), placing the Georgia Congressman in an extremely powerful position as far as America's health is concerned. Given his dubious track record, this appointment is of serious concern.

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There's no need to elaborate on the benefits of 3D printing in medicine. While transplants will remain the most practical option for replacing whole organs, lab-constructed replicas for simpler body parts are making significant inroads every year. Australia, or more accurately, Queensland, will take a massive step towards being a world leader in this burgeoning field come 2017, when the Herston Biofabrication Institute opens its doors in Brisbane.

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Hospitals across Melbourne were put on emergency alert on Monday night as thousands of people called ambulance services, reporting breathing difficulties and other severe symptoms. Emergency rooms were so strained that day units were opened to handle the overflow. It was a severe outbreak of the phenomenon called "thunderstorm asthma" — but how does an emergency like this actually happen?

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The future of public health in the United States was a hotly contested topic during the 2016 US election, with the presidential candidates making bold promises and several important ballot initiatives up for grabs. Here's how America voted, and what a Trump presidency means to America's health.

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This only applies to people who have a condition where they can't scratch an itch, like an injury or skin condition (otherwise just scratch it), but one new — albeit small — study suggests an interesting way to relieve an itchy arm or leg when you can't scratch: Stand in front of a mirror and scratch the opposite limb.