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Australian Scientist Wins Ig Nobel Prize For Uncooking His Breakfast

Last week, the Ig Nobel Awards were held in a night that celebrates interesting discoveries made on the sillier side of science. Between a study of the usage of the word ‘huh’ and an experiment to make chickens walk like dinosaurs, the Prize for Chemistry was taken out by an Australian local — none other than the Flinders University Professor who discovered how to unboil an egg.

This Bacteria-Slaying Light Fixture Is Perfectly Safe For Humans

Bacteria-killing ultraviolet lights can sterilise everything from toothbrushes to bedsheets. But a new type of light fixture called the Indigo-Clean is able to wipe out those same dangerous pathogens while still being safe for patients or caregivers in a hospital.

This Vampire-Like Suction Device Lets Patients Draw Blood At Home

Patients dealing with cancer or infectious diseases require frequent blood tests to monitor their conditions. And, although important, frequent trips to the doctor to give samples can be very time-consuming. But a small device called the HemoLink that uses gentle vacuum pressure promises to let patients easily draw their own blood at home.

Swallowing This Capsule Lets Doctors Keep Tabs On Gas In Your Gut

A build up of intestinal gases isn’t just an etiquette problem — it’s also linked to conditions like irritable bowl syndrome. So researchers have created a swallowable capsule packed with sensors that’s able to measure the concentration of gases inside a patient, and wirelessly relay that info back to a smartphone app.

These Terrifyingly Real Teeth Were Made By A New Dental 3D Printer

The world is still trying to figure out why every home would need a 3D printer, but in the professional world they continue to thrive. At the International Dental Show currently going on in Germany, Stratasys announced a new 3D printer that uses multiple materials at once to create startlingly realistic dental models in a single print run.

This Sticker Automatically Injects Meds When A Chemo Patient Can't

Chemotherapy is a brutal but often life-saving treatment for an even worse disease. It can also reduce a patient’s white blood cell count which hinders the body’s ability to fight off infections, so injections of Neulasta (pegfilgrastim) are given the day after to help boost production. And to ensure those injections are given a full 27 hours after chemotherapy, this sticker, applied after treatment, automatically injects the necessary dosage exactly when needed.

Tiny Robot Grippers Dissolve Away In Your Body Once Their Job Is Done

As robots get small enough to easily swim around inside the human body, they will soon be used to perform medical procedures all from within a patient. And researchers at Johns Hopkins University are making such an idea even more plausible with the development of tiny robotic grippers that will actually dissolve away inside a patient after a medical procedure is complete.

Scientists Can Now Unboil Eggs To Hopefully Make Cancer Drugs Cheaper

It sounds like research that doesn’t have much more of a practical application than making people say “neat”, but chemists at UC Irvine have figured out a way to unboil egg whites — turning them from a solid back into a liquid — and the process behind it promises to help lower the production cost of cancer drugs and other expensive medications.

A Smart EpiPen Case Lets Family Know You're Having An Allergy Attack

Anyone dealing with severe allergies always carries an EpiPen. In an emergency it provides an injectable dose of epinephrine to narrow blood vessels and open airways to help minimise the dangerous symptoms of an allergy attack, and when used with the new Veta case that’s designed to safely store the EpiPen, it can automatically let your family or friends know when you’re having an allergy attack.

New Software Will Give Doctors A Panoramic View Inside Your Bladder

Images of long sandy beaches, breathtaking mountains, and even bustling cities come to mind when you think about an extra wide panoramic photo — not the inside of somebody’s bladder. But new software promises to give doctors a better view inside a patient’s plumbing by stitching countless images from an endoscope together, making it easier to spot problem areas during an exam.

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