Tagged With keys

4

TSA-recognised locks provide little more than a false sense of security. That's not news. It is news, however, that some hacker type has uploaded the CAD files of the agency's master keys to Github, so that anybody can 3D-print them at home. Let the stealing begin!

0

Keys is a MIDI keyboard, built with aspiring piano students in mind. It's a pretty small guy, making it a great travelling companion (who says you can't play a keyboard by the campfire?). But the coolest thing about Keys is it incorporates gestures — so you can travel up and down octaves by just waving your hands.

0

I'm a big fan of cutaway things, specially if they are real like this lock. It's fascinating to see how machines and mechanisms work, with the little pins and springs moving to fit the shape of the key, leaving the barrel free to move when everything clicks.

5

Nothing Apple announced on Tuesday has as much life-changing potential as this revolving keyring does. It's apparently based on a clever design from the late 1800s that was either lost to time, or confiscated by aliens to slow mankind's progress. Either way, it's back, and ready to save your fingernails every time you need to remove a key.

15

You can learn the basics of lock picking from a GIF, but for a more nuanced look at the techniques required to actually get a lock open without the key, check out NightHawkInLight's latest tutorial where he uses nothing but a pair of strategically bent hairpins in the process.

6

If you take a picture of a car or house key, could you use that picture to get a copy made? Yes — quite trivially, actually. I have a folder on my laptop that is filled with photos people have taken of their keys and put onto the internet. Every few weeks, I take some idle time and associate one of those keys to an address (lot of Googling, mostly) and then I decode the cuts in the key.

1

We all know the world's going to end at some point, and maybe it's not entirely "likely" to happen anytime soon — but better safe than sorry. So assuming you've already been working diligently on your underground, radiation-proof bunker, what's going to happen when you need extra keys made with nary a (non-zombie) locksmith in sight?

1

Long before prison guards started carrying tasers, tear gas and other non-lethal deterrents, they apparently relied on these cell door keys that also functioned as tiny one-shot pistols. They probably weren't lethal, but there's no doubt they packed enough of a punch to make an inmate very uncomfortable if they tried anything while a guard was unlocking their cell.

4

A course will teach you how to use your keys as a weapon, but when you're under attack and panicking, protecting yourself with a keyring isn't as easy as it sounds. So the Hit, from Unikia, combines a loud audible panic alarm with a pop-up holder that turns a key into a switchblade that's easier to wield as a weapon.

16

What if you lost your keys in-between your couch cushions last night and now you're late for work? What if you could pull out your phone and wander around your house to track where the keys were, or even better, how many times have you wished that your lost keys or wallet could call out to you when you lose them? Meet Tile: a nifty little gizmo to counter your stuff getting lost.

4

Prying the lids off tiny shipping crates, opening incredibly small rusted doors, fending off hordes of action figure-sized zombies: the uses for this keychain-sized crowbar are endless. And you can add it to your pocket toolbox for around $15 and never find yourself struggling to pry open a tiny coffin again.