Tagged With keyrings

4

Slap your signature all over everything like a very demure tag artist with these wonderful customisable inspector stamps. For $US23 a pop, you can add your address, your website, your Twitter handle if you're desperate, or whatever your little Lisa Frank-channelling heart desires.

4

Just like a camera, the best tripod is the one you have with you. There's no point in spending hundreds of dollars on a carbon fibre set of sticks if they're inconvenient to carry. The tiny Tiltpod Mobile is designed to attach to your keys, ensuring it's always close at hand — or at least somewhere in your pocket.

2

Key ring hooks generally come in two flavours - the kind you spent an age trying to find to suit your decor, or the kind that you (or your kids) made in woodwork class that you only put up because you don't have a better alternative. Hookeychain does away with the need for either, stylishly attaching to your fridge using a powerful magnet.

4

Maybe it's just me, but one of the most useful gadgets anybody can ever have is a bottle opener on a keyring. How many times have you been at a party and needed a bottle opener? The Screwpop takes that idea and adds both a Philips head and flat screwdriver, a 1/4-inch hex nut driver and a bottle opener, making it quite possibly the ultimate keyring companion.

1

Can anyone - anyone - please explain to me the appeal of having a cheap mono speaker attached to your keyring? Aside from the fact that this actually promotes kids to ignore gadget etiquette, considering the speaker is a tiny 2.5cm cube that incorporates a 3.5mm headphone jack and a rechargeable battery (and a USB port to charge it), the sound quality is sure to be something akin to a wailing banshee, and not just when you're listening to 2DayFM. Not only that, but who wants a one-inch cube bulging from their pants pocket? For the $30 price tag, you could be well on your way to a decent set of portable stereo speakers.

1

The previously Japan only Mugen Puchi Puchi bubble wrap toy is now available in the US for $US5.99. It's available in four colours: cold sore pink, pea soup green, dying of exposure blue and cadaver grey. It's fun, yes, but the sound effect unfortunately doesn't sound all that much like the *POP* of a real bubble wrap bubble and more of like a generic sound effect speaker noise from a handheld game you played in 1985. You do get a fart, barking dog or door chime sound every 100 pops, which is worth something, I think. It comes in keychain form so as to prevent your keys from flying away, Mary Poppins style.

0

This tiny GPS system from Kapten shuns the current preoccupation for large, high-detail touchscreens... it has, in fact, no screen at all. There're a bunch of led-lit icons at the top, indicating car-, pedestrian-mode and so on, but that's it. All navigation requests and instructions are made by you talking to the Kapten and it talking to you. It's apparently aimed mainly at pedestrian users, and measuring 7.4 x 4.3 x 1.3 cm is small enough to slip onto a key ring. Somehow there's a Bluetooth chipset in there, alongside an MP3 player and FM radio, and it packs 4GB of internal memory. Sadly, the only instructions it'll utter will sound like "Tournez à droite, dans 100 metres" since it's being released in France next month for around US$220, and there's no info on whether it'll move outside the land of the moody pout.