Tagged With journalism

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Recode's Peter Kafka reported today that the New York Times has agreed to pay $US30 million ($39.4 million) for The Wirecutter and The Sweethome, both of which were founded by Brian Lam, the former editor of Gizmodo. The paper later confirmed the all-cash acquisition (but not its exact terms) in a lengthy press release explaining the sites' appeal to the Times' bottom line.

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Virtual reality, a dream of science fiction writers for decades, is the closest to a true reality than it's ever been. Multiple headsets are on sale to consumers, and while some aren't exactly affordable to the common person, such as the HTC Vive or the Oculus Rift, and others work better than others,the upcoming years will only bring more innovation to the industry.

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I look to my left and see a sorrowful parent sitting on the curb, comforting his daughter. I look to my right, and I see notes of sympathy among many flowers. Around me, I hear people murmuring respects and singing in French. I'm in the middle of a vigil in the streets of Paris, a week after last month's tragic shooting.

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It's easy to think of data journalism as a modern invention. With all the hype, a casual reader might assume that it was invented sometime during the 2012 presidential campaign.

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There's a startup called NowThisNews that delivers the news du jour in short videos embedded on their site and mobile apps. But these days, apparently that's not enough. So the Awl has noticed, now in addition, NowThisNews is sending out news bulletins via Snapchat. Abandon all hope.

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Over in the US last night, CBS ran an American 60 Minutes special about the ongoing NSA debacle. It claimed to give "unprecedented access to the agency's HQ" and "for the first time" explain "what it does and what it says it doesn't do: spy on Americans." It was also, incidentally, a pile of steaming bull. Watch...

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Just the other day, the New York Post outed Bloomberg reporters for monitoring Bloomberg terminals to track Wall Street traders' accounts. Now, the Financial Times has pointed out another egregious but unrelated security problem: apparently more than 10 thousand confidential terminal records have been on the internet — searchable by Google — probably for years.

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Trading on Wall Street is basically a huge game of poker and it would be kind of hard to bluff or cover your strategy if Bloomberg reporters were watching your account to see which resources you were accessing on Bloomberg terminals. So you assume that they are not abusing their company affiliation, because it would be shady and weird. Aka they are definitely doing that.