Tagged With java

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Editor's log, Stardate sixteen eleven oh nine: I find myself slowly becoming overwhelmed by the sheer volume of application stores available to the modern phone user. What started off as a fresh, original idea to sell applications for a dedicated device has quickly descended into the murky bog of confusion as every phone maker and his dog jumps on the bandwagon. What's worse - I'm receiving reports that now the telcos are trying to cut into this already overcrowded market, with Optus launching its own app store for Symbian, Android, Blackberry, Windows media and Java handsets. This is the toughest assignment we've ever encountered, and it's going to require all our strength to overcome it.

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On Monday Nokia, NAVTEQ and UC Berkeley will launch the Mobile Millennium project which will use GPS data from thousands of mobile phones to gather traffic information in the San Francisco Bay Area. By having users relay and access the information, it will enable them to find and avoid traffic congestion, similar to the Dash Express GPS system. I'd participate, but I wonder how much researchers would benefit from my daily commute from bed to kitchen table.

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Mobile Skype was previously only available on Smartphones like Windows Mobile, but they've just ported a Java version for all kinds of non-smart phones. Be aware that this isn't like the previous iterations and even Skype to Skype calls cost money (or use up your minutes), so there's no huge reason in using this to call someone you can easily call already. What it is useful for is calling overseas, since you use up regular minutes but only get charged SkypeOut rates instead of your exorbitant mobile phone international call rates.

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Apple gave Sun kind of the cold shoulder, not giving them the opportunity to put Java on the iPhone for Java apps. Now that the SDK is out, Sun's decided to just take matters into their own hands and prep a Java Virtual Machine for the device that'll allow Java applets to run on it. The JVM for iPhone will be based on Java Micro Edition, allowing apps like games and enterprise applications. You know, uh, all the stuff we've been clamoring for. I guess. Well, I'm sure at least a couple of interesting programs will come out of this, right? We'll see how Apple handles Sun sneaking Java onto the iPhone this way.

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The latest Opera Mobile Browser, version 9.5, has just been previewed in time for GSMA 2008. The new version tries to be more like a desktop browser and adds a full text history search, allowing you to find pages you forgot to bookmark previously. Flash gets a look in too, since Flash Lite 3.0 support is included. More, including the press release, below.

Claiming to be 2.5x faster than Internet Explorer Mobile, Opera 9.5 has an improved rendering engine to better handle JavaScript- and Ajax-laden web pages. It can also serve web content directly to a phone's idle screen, which will either create some cool web-linked functionality, or allow mobile operators to splash more branding onto their phones. Opera Widgets, and Opera Zoom and panning make it sound like the iPhone's UI, don't they?

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newVideoPlayer("autofoosball_gawker.flv", 475, 376);

Four engineering students from Georgia Tech have built an Autonomous Foosball Table, quite possibly the key to my never-ending quest to replace the humans in my life with robots. The funny thing is, this thing isn't just a gimmick; it may soon become a decent foosball opponent. The table system cost about $500 to build, and combines a webcam, an 800MHz Pentium PC and servo-controlled paddles to move, twist, and kick. Here's how it works.

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Rumor has it that Sun Microsystems and Samsung are jointly developing a "Java Phone" that is cheaper and more feature rich than Apple's iPhone. Details are scarce, but a Samsung spokesperson confirmed that a meeting has taken place between the two companies regarding the phone, but the details of that conversation have not been made public. Rumors are rumors, but if true, it would take a lot of convincing to prove that a Java UI could come anywhere near Apple in terms of execution. That having been said, could JavaFXbe involved?

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If you ditched your watch because you carry a phone around with a built-in clock, but are sick of pulling your phone out every time you want to check the time, you should check out this Haptic Clock. It's a small program for Java phones that tells you the time through a series of vibrations, allowing you to keep your phone in your pocket.

Simply reach in your pocket and hit the 5 key to get it to tell you the time. How does it tell it to you?

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Sun Microsystems has its eyes on the iPhone and in order to beat it has announced a new cellphone technology dubbed JavaFX. The new software is essentially a mobile version of Java meant to provide cellphones with a clean, streamlined interface. The phone on the right is an example of what a cellphone with JavaFX would look like interface-wise. Pretty snazzy if you ask me. No other details have been announced yet, but the software is expected to make its debut today at the JavaOne Conference in San Francisco. – Louis Ramirez

Here Comes the Sun Conference