Tagged With ivy bridge

5

Intel's "3rd generation" CPUs, codenamed "Ivy Bridge", bring a number of improvements over the previous generation, Sandy Bridge. Unfortunately, for those of us used to getting progressively faster and cooler performing CPUs from Intel, Ivy Bridge delivered on the former front, but not so much the latter.

13

With WWDC just around the bend, it's time to face the usual torrent of leaks and dribbles and rumours and lies. While this look at a rumoured MacBook could well be the latter, it certainly matches up with what we'd expect. Except, maybe, for that display.

6

After many delays, Intel's Ivy Bridge processors were finally unleashed on the world last month. Now here comes the notebook version. Next week we'll get a look at the first wave of Ivy Bridge ultrabooks, courtesy of Intel.

1

Intel's hot new next-gen chipset looks like it'll be making an appearance in Apple's computer ranges rather soon, with Ivy Bridge processors popping up in some Apple tech benchmarks.

7

You are, no doubt, quite familiar with Intel's CPU-release "cadence" of tick-tock by now. If not, the short story is that every tock brings a major breakthrough, while ticks are decent upgrades but nothing to Twitter home about. That's not necessarily the case with Intel's latest tick, the Ivy Bridge CPU. Sure, the performance enhancements on the x86 side of the aisle won't exactly knock you on your tuchus, but they're still decent. The upgrades to the graphics core, however, make Ivy Bridge more noteworthy.

6

Intel's upcoming Ivy Bridge platform has been touted and celebrated for months, and the thing hasn't so much as been touched by nary a consumer. But now the anticipated CPU has made it into devices, and a couple of lucky guys have gotten their hands on it early. How does it perform? It's powerful. Real powerful. Like faster-than-a-laptop-with-discrete-graphics powerful.

4

Intel is set to roll out its latest generation of processors later this year despite a minor setback affecting ultra low-voltage models — the ones destined for super slim notebooks. By normal standards, the launch should mark a new "tick" in the company's product roadmap, but Intel is going beyond just shrinking the current 32nm Sandy Bridge processor by introducing some fundamental advancements along with its new 22nm process.

6

There have been suggestions floating around that Intel's new Ivy Bridge processors would arrive later than anticipated on the market. Now, those rumours have been confirmed as true by a senior Intel employee, so we won't see the processors in April as previously expected.