Tagged With iomega

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Multitasking. It's a wonderful thing, especially when you're talking hardware that can scratch two itches at once. Which is why the Iomega SuperHero is worth getting excited about: It's a charging station, sure, but its SD card tailpipe means that it also backs up all those important files you keep on your iPhone. Wait, did I say all? I meant some - and only if you're really, really patient.

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The world was rocked by the infinite format war, but hardware makers answered with HD media players that can read damn near everything. Iomega's newest ScreenPlay Director players decode a vast array of 1080p video - and serves CinemaNow movies.

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EMC bought Iomega so that it could start easing its business-grade storage gear into homes and small offices, and the StorCenter ix2 is the first official combo of Iomega brand and EMC juice. Before I get into its LifeLine Linux environment, I wanted to point out that this thing is priced to move: A full two-disk 1TB NAS costs $US300—and you can double it to 2TB for $US480. I know HDD prices are dropping but that's a pretty good deal to me. Here's what you get with the storage: galleryPost('iomegaix2', 3, '');

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Who doesn't love a Zip drive? With their sweet 100MB of magnetic memory, they used to save my arse back in the day. (My Performa 6400 even had an internal Zip drive.) And who doesn't love a marionette? With their beady eyes and history of horror-film animation, they touch the heart of any child from 1 to 100, sometimes with a knife. Put the two together, and what do you get?

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Sure we'd all love to see the little bus-powered 2.5" Iomega eGo drives hit 1TB, but that's not happening today. Instead, Iomega is porting their sleek, shiny, colourful design to the 3.5" realm, launching 1-terabyte Super eGo (get it?) drives in blue, red and black. For the time being, they're only USB 2.0—no FireWire or eSATA options—you still need a power supply, and we're gonna guess that they're spinning at 5400rpm. The good news is that they'll cost just US$270, not bad for a hefty TB.

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The people who brought you the camouflage eGo portable USB hard drive have traded the hunting rifle for the meerschaum pipe: the leather-clad 250GB eGo, which goes on sale today for just over US$140, will look good in any study, but best in ones where there's a roaring fire and many leather-bound books. Iomega takes pains to note that this is the only leather portable drive on the market. Our guess is that, as stylish as it is, it may remain so for a while. (Second photo after the jump.)

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Iomega's new Screenplay HD Multimedia drive promises that you can "leave the PC behind" since it stores your movies, pics and tunes and connects directly to your HDTV. You simply save them via the USB2.0 connection, and it's standalone from there on. It can upscale to to 720p and 1080i, plays a wide bunch of formats and connects via HDMI, SCART, composite audio and video or coaxial S/PDIF. With 500GB inside it should be able to store about 750 hours of MPEG2 at 780 x 480 pixels: that's around 500 movies. It's available now for US$218.45.

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We just heard that Iomega was icing its plan to release HomeCenter, a Windows Home Server product like the ones currently available from HP. The company stresses that this decision has "nothing to do with the bug" that's been corrupting data saved directly to WHS systems from certain applications. Instead, Iomega felt that the high cost of the device itself, essentially a PC, was prohibitively unprofitable at the moment. Iomega naturally wants to look good, as it's in talks to be acquired by EMC. But there weren't many recognisable names in the initial WHS launch list to begin with—if nobody wants to build these home servers for a mass market, how long can the product survive?