Tagged With insects

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Seriously, I strongly warn you to not lean into your screen to get a better look at this monstrosity. This video shows the remains of a dead cricket that some random hiker stepped on while enjoying the great outdoors. Suddenly, the tranquillity of nature was interrupted by the reality of life and the parasites that erupted out of the cricket's corpse.

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Meet the Lichen Katydid, an insect that has such impressive camouflage skills that it can hide in plain sight when walking on a lichen (a plant-like composite organism of an alga and a fungus). The bug's body matches the wisps of the lichen so damn well that you're not even sure which part belongs to which.

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Do not be alarmed by this heavily armed, parasitic wasp that bears no close relationship to any other organism, and is such a badarse that it apparently traded flying for leaping like a grasshopper. Mercifully, Aptenoperissus burmanicus went extinct a long time ago.

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"8000 locust, 2000 crickets, 4000 cockroaches. See you tomorrow night," was the text Huck Magazine writer Michael Segalov received hours before activists unleashed those exact breeds and quantities of insects inside a Byron burger location in London. The bugs came from activists upset by some recent anti-immigration activities at the chain and their vengeance was swift.

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Look, I didn't want to write this. Centipedes have too many legs and they move so quickly and it's all just nasty and wrong. However, how these disgusting creatures move is of interest to scientists, including some at Kyoto University who used computer simulations and robotics to delve into this strange movement.

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Video: To test the sticking power of the glue used inside its Gokiburi Hoi Hoi roach traps, a Japanese pest control company called Earth Chemical created a human-sized version and then made a scientist, athlete and sumo wrestler attempt to get from one end of it to the other. They all failed miserably. But watching the three of them get painfully stuck might actually be harder than trying to get across this mess yourself.

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Video: Photographer Levon Biss takes such incredibly detailed pictures of insects (most smaller than 1cm) that he can blow up his insect portraits to nearly 3m in size. It's a treat to see him work. And there is just so much work involved in photographing each insect. He lights each specific section of the bug (antennas, eyes and so on) and photographs them individually so that every part will look its best. Because he uses a microscopic lens to capture the detail in each bug, he has to take thousands of photos to make up for its shallow depth of field. His final images are made up of 8000-10,000 photographs. Incredible.

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Image Cache: Does it come as any surprise that a portrait photographer's hobby would still be photography? Given that Levon Biss didn't have room for an entire portrait studio at home, he turned to shooting insects in his spare time. But his macro setup and skills have resulted in some of the most spectacular insect portraits you'll ever see.

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Bed bugs are among the most dreaded pests we have to deal with, and they're proving to be a formidable foe. New research suggests that bed bugs are able to ward off insecticides by developing thicker skins.

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If the waterlily beetle were the size of a human, it would fly along the surface of a pond at 500km/h. Then again, if a waterlily beetle were human, it wouldn't fly at all. The beetle is subject to, and able to take advantage of, forces we don't even notice — and when scientists did notice, they realised that the beetle was flying the way no other bug in the world does.