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Activists Fill Burger Chain With Thousands Of Locusts, Crickets And Cockroaches

“8000 locust, 2000 crickets, 4000 cockroaches. See you tomorrow night,” was the text Huck Magazine writer Michael Segalov received hours before activists unleashed those exact breeds and quantities of insects inside a Byron burger location in London. The bugs came from activists upset by some recent anti-immigration activities at the chain and their vengeance was swift.


Somebody Tested How A Centipede Moves Because Of Course They Did

Look, I didn’t want to write this. Centipedes have too many legs and they move so quickly and it’s all just nasty and wrong. However, how these disgusting creatures move is of interest to scientists, including some at Kyoto University who used computer simulations and robotics to delve into this strange movement.


Why Female Praying Mantises Devour Their Partners During Sex

Female praying mantises have a habit of killing and eating their partners during sex, which sucks for the male. Or does it? A fascinating new study shows that this sacrifice is actually giving the males a distinct reproductive advantage.


Ancient Insects Had Some Pretty Funky Camo

New evidence shows that insects were using camouflage to hide from their predators as many as 100 million years ago — and wow did these ancient bugs ever employ some strange forms of deception.


Testing Roach Trap Glue On Humans Is Pure Torture

Video: To test the sticking power of the glue used inside its Gokiburi Hoi Hoi roach traps, a Japanese pest control company called Earth Chemical created a human-sized version and then made a scientist, athlete and sumo wrestler attempt to get from one end of it to the other. They all failed miserably. But watching the three of them get painfully stuck might actually be harder than trying to get across this mess yourself.


Dung Beetles Navigate By Storing Star Maps In Their Tiny Brains

Dung beetles have this really neat trick by which they’re able to use the positions of the stars to orient themselves along a straight line, making them the only known animal to use the Milky Way for navigation. Exactly how they do this has remained a mystery — until now.


Mankind Doesn't Stand A Chance Now That Robotic Cockroaches Have Started Cooperating

The scourge of puppies, babies and robotic vacuums is no longer a problem for robotic cockroaches. Researchers at UC Berkeley have taught this pair of VelociRoACHes to cooperate and help each other tackle stairs using a tiny magnetic winch and old-fashioned teamwork.


John Oliver To Cicadas: Here's Everything You Missed Since 1999

Video: This year, the cicadas flooding the Northeastern United States will actually be 17 years old, due to the strange insect’s 17-year-long gestation period. Needless to say, lots of things have happened since 1999.


Taking Incredibly Detailed Pictures Of Bugs Is A Work Of Art

Video: Photographer Levon Biss takes such incredibly detailed pictures of insects (most smaller than 1cm) that he can blow up his insect portraits to nearly 3m in size. It’s a treat to see him work. And there is just so much work involved in photographing each insect. He lights each specific section of the bug (antennas, eyes and so on) and photographs them individually so that every part will look its best. Because he uses a microscopic lens to capture the detail in each bug, he has to take thousands of photos to make up for its shallow depth of field. His final images are made up of 8000-10,000 photographs. Incredible.


You've Never Seen Insect Portraits Like These

Image Cache: Does it come as any surprise that a portrait photographer’s hobby would still be photography? Given that Levon Biss didn’t have room for an entire portrait studio at home, he turned to shooting insects in his spare time. But his macro setup and skills have resulted in some of the most spectacular insect portraits you’ll ever see.


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