Tagged With india

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Delhi, the capital city of India and home to 25 million residents, is in the midst of an "extreme pollution event". In other words the city has been overrun with smog - a ton of it. Recent photographs show the extent of the problem, which is being blamed on everything from vehicle emissions and crop burning through to smoking and fireworks.

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Facebook board director, venture capitalist and proof-of-concept egg/human hybrid Marc Andreessen has carried out a most impressive feat — a tweet so bad he simultaneously destroyed Facebook's party line about its Free Basics program and implied that India would be better off still ruled by England.

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Image Cache: Here is a trash fire. This new image posted by the NASA Earth Observatory shows the devastating smoke cloud coming off the Deonar dumping ground in Mumbai, India. According to the report, the landfill handles 3700 metric tonnes of waste ever day, accounting for about a third of the city's garbage.

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With 2015 officially done (and its best destinations checked off your to-do list), it’s time for a brand new set of places to put your passport through its paces.

The top travel spots of 2016 offer something for everyone. There are countries celebrating major milestones, old favourites resurfacing for fresh reasons, and changes in travel restrictions that make some locations more accessible than ever. The big destinations are getting bigger. The up and coming destinations are dangling on the cusp of a tourism rush.

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There's a certain ignored artistry to manhole covers. Millions of people walk over them every day and pay no attention to what they look like or where they're from or how they're made. They come from all over the world, with one of the largest exporters of manhole covers being in Howrah, India. The methods they use there to forge these street caps seem to come from a different era. It's so fascinating to watch the process and the stamps and the molten metal and the design and the the literal leg work required to make them.

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In the next ten years, Earth's population is expected to increase by one billion, and only three percent of our planet's water is fit for drinking or farming. Most of that relatively small amount is trapped in frozen glaciers. But Egyptian researchers have developed a way of removing the salt out of sea water for our growing population in a way that's super energy efficient.