Tagged With image cache

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Last night, photographers around the world turned their cameras to the sky to capture the closest full moon — also known as a supermoon — since 1948. We've scoured the web to bring you some of our favourite photos of the celestial event that took our minds off the current state of world affairs for a few blissful minutes.

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Image Cache: As the US election nears, America can at times feel like a hideous and hateful place. Let this map of the United States' river basins made by Imgur user Fejetlenfej remind you that, at the very least, it can be beautiful. Fejetlenfej — a geographer who sells their maps on Etsy — created the image using QGIS software, which is an open-source geographic information system. The map depicts both "the permanent and temporary streams and rivers," the creator explained. They divided the streams into catchment areas, which show when rainfall flows into a river, lake or reservoir. Using the Strahler Stream Order Classification, which is a system used by geologists to define stream sizes, Fejetlenfej explained that on the map, "the higher the stream order, the thicker the line".

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Image Cache: Well, sort of. Photographer Mike Kelley camped out at Sydney's Kingsford Smith Airport, along with 17 other airports around the world, to capture hundreds of photos of airplanes large and small on their takeoff climbs. Stitched together, the result looks like some kind of perfectly coordinated flying magic.

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Image Cache: This wonderful photo series comparing the size of things by Kevin Wisbith is a really fun way to earn some brain wrinkles, because it gives you a better sense of the true size of random buildings, ships, machines and other objects. You get to see things like the Death Star hover over Florida in space, a B-2 bomber stretch across the width of an entire football field and the Titanic lay out on top of a freaking aircraft carrier.

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Image Cache: At 8:39PM AEST yesterday, a spacecraft weighing over 2000k with a wingspan half that of a Boeing 747 crashed gently into a comet's surface, following 13 hours of free-fall. These, my friends, are the last, fleeting glimpses of Comet 67P that Rosetta managed to capture before its instruments went dead.

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Image Cache: The finalists are in for the Natural History Museum's 2016 Wildlife Photographer of Year competition. From inquisitive fox cubs and invisible fish through to termite tossing birds and courting cuttlefish, this year's crop is guaranteed to astound.