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The Forgotten History Behind Some Of America's Busiest Airports

Have you flown through LaGuardia Airport, Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport, or Chicago O’Hare International Airport when visiting America? It turns out each of these airports has a bizarre and little-known backstory.

Why Did The Turkey Stop Being Sacred?

Centuries ago, Americans didn’t eat turkeys — they revered them. But around the mid-1000s, Puebloan peoples of the American Southwest started roasting the sacred bird. What happened?

Here Is How Dinner Changed Over The Last 100 Years

Video: It’s not the most comprehensive look at the history of food but Mode’s video showcasing 100 years of dinner is really enjoyable to watch because it’s just pure fun to find out all the stuff, both delicious and horrific, that people used to put in their bodies. The video captures the food trends of America pretty well — TV dinners, SPAM, fondue, ethnic cuisines, kale! — and makes you crave stuff you’ve forgotten about (sloppy joes) or just find disgustingly intriguing (creamed chipped beef).

The US Government Is Being Sued For Losing A Critical JFK Assassination Film

The Zapruder film may be the most famous footage taken of the Kennedy assassination, but it’s not the only one. The “Nix Film” may be lesser known, but it’s no less important. It has been missing for decades, so the granddaughter of the photographer who captured the film is now suing the US government. She wants it returned, or be paid $US10 million.

The Secret History Of Silicon Valley And The Toxic Remnants Of The First Computers 

Today, Silicon Valley is a dreamy officescape, a place where ideas and networks are currency. But in the 1960s and ’70s, Silicon Valley proper manufactured hardware — and this industrial boom created one of the most polluted places in America.

How A Radical 1960s Architect Inspired NASA's Next Great Space Robot 

NASA’s bizarre Super Ball Bot is unlike any robot ever built — it uses a net of wires and rods to move, and could someday explore harsh exoplanets. It also has an unlikely heritage: It was inspired by the ideas of a visionary from the 1960s building floating cities based on the same concept.

The Gruesome History Of The Galapagos Islands' Nietzsche-Fuelled Homesteader Death Showdown

The Galapagos Islands are best known for their giant tortoises, but they’re also the site of one of the most bizarre homesteading misadventures ever, complete with proto-hippies, a polyamorous baroness, potentially poisoned boiled chicken, births in pirate caves, and unsolved deaths that look a lot like murder.

There Were American Nazi Summer Camps Across The US In The 1930s

During the latter half of the 1930s, a surprising number of Nazi-themed summer camps sprouted across the United States. Organised locally and without the support of Germany, these summer outings bore a startling resemblance to the Hitler Youth. Here’s what these camps were like — and how, for a short time, the Third Reich came to America.

Princesses, Slaves, And Explosives: The Scandalous Origins Of Inoculation

The history of inoculation may sound a little dry, but it’s really an epic tale of human trafficking, semi-illicit experimentation, and high explosives. It’s a globe-hopping story that stars harem girls, noblewomen, prisoners, princesses, slaves, and even a witch hunter.

The Caves That Held A Secret Hungarian Aircraft Factory During World War II

In 1944 and 1945, the Allies were attacking the last supporter of Nazi Germany. Tens of thousands of tonnes of bombs were dropped on Hungarian ground targets, mostly by the Consolidated B-24 Liberator and Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombers of the 15th Air Force. By the end of the World War II, the rain of incendiary and demolition bombs had wiped out all important industrial targets that fed the weakening war machine of the Third Reich — except one. The factory hiding under the 10th district of Budapest did not stop manufacturing fighter aircraft even during the most devastating air raids.

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