Tagged With history

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Video: If you're a map nerd or a history buff or someone who likes to travel or just a person who enjoys learning new things, the latest video from Wendover Productions is an absolute delight to watch. It's a quick tour of all the countries in the world (this is the first part, so exactly half the countries show up) filled with totally random but fun facts about each country.

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Video: Humanity gets served up a nice slice of humble pie in this NPR video that lays out the history of our planet on a football field. Even in a giant stadium, every inch represents an incredible 1.3 million years - that's around 511,000 years for every centimetre. Which means that humans, who walk around like they own the place, only show up about a third of a centimetre from the end zone.

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Video: It's a little bit sad that phones have replaced cameras because after watching this animated history of cameras by Portero Delantero, you start to miss all that fun camera hardware with quirky designs and lovely character you just don't get from a thin rectangular slab. Sure, the best camera is the one that's with you (blah blah) but damn, come on, I'd love to be able to lug around a 1947 Graflex Pacemaker Crown Graphic today.

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A commercial diver working near Haida Gwaii off Canada's west coast has spotted a strange object on the seafloor that bears a striking resemblance to a nuclear device lost from a US B-36 bomber that crashed in the area 66 years ago. The Canadian government is sending naval ships to investigate.

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There is an historian working out of The Australian National University working hard on examining America's history. What makes this unique is the media he is using as his sources.

It's comic books.

While American history is often explored through the lens of classical literature such as the works of Ernest Hemingway or F Scott Fitzgerald, Dr Chris Bishop said as much - or more - could be learned through examining the world of comics.

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Video: It's a little bit surprising that humans took so dang long to invent the sandwich. We'd had bread, meat and cheese for aeons, but it wasn't until 1762, when the degenerate gambler John Montague, the Fourth Earl of Sandwich, decided that he wanted to have a handheld dinner (so that he could gamble with the other hand, as it goes), that the sandwich was invented. Like, I genuinely feel bad for everyone who lived before then.

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Video: From Sam O'Nella, here's an amusing look at some of the weird, creative and deeply sinister weapons used during the Medieval period, when castles and knights and dragons existed (oh wait). The six-storey tall super giant Warwolf trebuchet, used to bludgeon castles to bits; Greek fire flamethrowers that basically burned everyone and everything; and a terrible use of pigeons, sparrows and their nests to light an entire city on fire.

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Video: The simple and obvious answer: They come from the Romans. But the whole story on how the months of the year got their names is a little bit more interesting and includes bits about how the calendar first started in March, how they just started naming months after numbers after June, how there were month-less days and how Julius Caesar tweaked it all. History is fun.

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Have you ever wondered why Americans and Brits spell English differently? How are colour and colour the same word? Centre and center? What's up with that? It's all thanks to Noah Webster (yeah, the Webster of Merriam-Webster). When America gained independence, Webster wanted to simplify unreasonable spellings that were handed down from the British.

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Video: So how does somebody even win a Nobel Peace Prize? Ted-Ed delves into the history of the award (how it is one of the five prizes created by Alfred Nobel, the inventor of dynamite); the nomination process (a bunch of people can nominate somebody including past laureates, university professors, member of governments and others); and the standards they use to judge the nominees: Disarmament, peace congresses, brotherhood between nations, human rights and peace negotiations.

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Video: Medieval Viking Ulfberht swords are some of the most famous swords in history because they were so obscenely strong that it's almost unbelievable that bladesmiths in the 9th century were even able to make them. Made from crucible steel, the swords stood out from everything from that time period. Hell, the process of forging these Ulfberht swords is so difficult that even modern bladesmiths have trouble getting the sword right.

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Video: Forgotten Weapons sees a lot of odd firearms, from a machine gun that Italian troops would mount to bicycles to Uzis that look like horseshoes. But the Frankenau purse gun takes the cake for pure strangeness.