history

Scientists Reveal The Secrets Of Mysterious Ship Found Under Twin Towers

Scientists have found the secrets of the old ship unearthed in 2010 under the ruins of the Twin Towers. First, the large vessel — buried under 6.7m of soil and wreckage — was built around the same time the Declaration of Independence was signed. There’s more — but there’s also one big mystery left unsolved.


There's An Actual Piece Of The Wright Flyer Inside Bremont's New Watch

Starting in 2010, Bremont has been paying homage to significant moments in the history of technology with a unique line of watches that includes the Codebreaker which celebrated the work of the WWII Enigma machine crackers. Now the watchmaker is honouring the Wright Brothers’ achievements with a new timepiece that includes an actual piece of the original Wright Flyer.


A Brief History Of Pi

That the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter is constant has been known to humanity since ancient times; yet, even today, despite 2000 years of thought, theories, calculations and proofs, π’s precise value remains elusive.


Why Neil Armstrong Got To Take The First Step On The Moon

On July 20, 1969, with “one small step”, Neil Armstrong became the first person to walk on the moon. But why did he get to go first?


Watch How American Cities Grew Through Thousands Of Historic Maps

Good thing it’s almost the holiday weekend and you don’t need to be productive because the USGS just launched a heck of a time-wasting website. Now you can explore cities through beautiful old maps, some dating all the way back to 1884. But here’s the best part: You can mix and match many maps to tell your own geographic story.


How Scotch Was Invented

Scotch has been referred to as “the water of life”, and to many who know its allure today, they can understand why. Yet the chronicle of this sometimes, smoky, often nutty, occasionally fruity elixir is poorly known, and in fact, its precise origin is lost to the mists of time (or more likely, drinking Scotch).


How Australia Connected To The Internet 25 Years Ago

It is a quarter-century since Australia first connected to the internet, but this technological breakthrough had a long gestation. What is now a global phenomenon was once the property of an exclusive community.


How WWI Bombs Shattered Bedrock And Changed The Geology Of France

Every once in a while, we’re reminded of World War I’s awful legacy: Trenches that run like gashes through the French countryside, craters in farmland, the iron harvest. These scars are even deeper than we might imagine. Bombs actually shattered bedrock and created the bizarre, dimpled landscape of modern day Verdun.


How Two Women Made Your Watch Glow In The Dark

On 21 December 1898, Marie and Pierre Curie discovered the radioactive element radium (in the form of radium chloride), extracting it from uraninite. They first removed the uranium from the uraninite sample and then found that the remaining matter was still radioactive, so investigated further. Along with the barium in the remaining substance, they also detected spectral lines that were crimson carmine, which no one had yet documented or, apparently, observed. These spectral lines were being given off by radium chloride, which they managed to separate from the barium. Five days later, they presented their findings to the French Academy of Sciences.


Unlock The Past: How A 19th Century Lock Pick Changed Security Forever

In April 1851, Alfred C. Hobbs boarded the steamship Washington bound for Southampton, England. His official duty was to sell the New York City-based company Day and Newell’s newest product — the parautopic lock — at a trade show — London’s Great Exhibition. But Hobbs had something a bit more nefarious up his sleeve, or rather in the small trunk that accompanied him on the ship.