Tagged With heating

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We all know someone who can never seem to get comfy, no matter the temperature. They're always pulling off sweaters because they're too hot, or cranking up the heat because they're too cold. But soon, salvation for these folks could come in the form of a special wristband that uses a copper heatsink to fool your body into thinking it's just been warmed or cooled — when in reality the ambient temperature hasn't changed.

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Winter has just ticked over to spring, but that doesn't mean it's suddenly warm outside: the heater, electric blanket or fire might still be on. Even if you're not trying to stay warm, you can still waste energy: you don't have to be a glutton to waste energy — many homeowners with good intentions still end up blowing money this time of year. Here's a look at a 16 common mistakes folks make — and some quick fixes and long-term solutions to keeping a home's systems running as efficiently and inexpensively as possible.

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This summer is a hot one. With money tight and temperatures high, there's a temptation to test out unconventional ways to beat the the heat. But these odd home remedies can end up wasting energy and costing more money. Here's how to know what really works when you want to keep cool for cheap.

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So many options to describe this product: "stick your hands up a (USB) monkey for warmth" or "cheat the chills with chimp USB mitts." I'm sure you can do better. It's a pair of monkey-shaped USB hand warmers, for when you're typing in the cold, or you're a sufferer of chilly hands. They get up to 46 degrees in just five minutes, have a built-in wrist support for "supporting your tired wrist when using Mouse or Keyboard" and they'll fit hands up to 17 x 11 cm, or thereabouts, and when they're up to temp you can even disconnected them for freestyle use. galleryPost('usbmonkeys', 3, '');

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Generally, I don't consider radiators to be all that interesting (unless it is shaped like a Lego brick), but this coiled radiator design from Ciussai is definitely an exception. The metal wire tubing can be wound and stretched much like a garden hose, which gives it far more functionality than simply heating a room. For example: you can coil it around a bar to dry clothes or lay it on your bed to warm things up on a cold night. I don't know how safe all of this is, but I love the idea. And the best part is that it can actually be purchased from Ad Hoc—although pricing details are unknown.

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Sure, that Thanko cooling fan keyboard was a great addition to your desktop for the summer, but temperatures have gotten chillier now and we're all wondering how to keep our wrists warm. Why, with Thanko's upgraded heating AND cooling keyboard, of course! The wintertime edition has three different warming spots that'll make your hands all toasty. And if things get too hot, switch it back to fan mode to cool your fingers off. This miraculous weather-weathering peripheral is available on the Thanko website for roughly $US50.

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If you're planning on a long distance ski trip or a mountain climb this winter, check out Ardica's new power and heat platform for outerwear. Not only will Ardica-enabled jackets charge your gadgets (up to 11 full charges on your mobile phone and 20 on your iPod), it'll also keep you nice and warm for either nine hours on low heat or three hours on high. If you'll be in the cold for even longer than that, just bring along a second battery.

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Winter is just around the corner and, with gas prices still unstable, it's now even more important to monitor your thermostat. That's tough and annoying though, which is why gadgets like Ecobee are coming out on the market. Ecobee has an integrated programmable smart thermostat with a WiFi-enabled touchscreen that automatically sets your household to conserve energy at the press of a button. galleryPost('ecobee', 3, '');

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Researchers in Japan and at Penn State have come up with a ceramic material that allows people to heat up their food twice as fast, allowing them to spend less time staring at the microwave and more time living their (read: our) rich, fulfilling lives. The new cookers are made up of 20% magnetite and 80% petalite, which unlike traditional bowls, heat up alongside the food so that the food isn't passing off heat by warming up the bowl. As an added bonus, the container stays hot for 15 minutes, meaning you really need oven mitts to transport this thing, Jason Statham style. If you can't wait for technology to catch up here, it's already on sale in Japan.