Tagged With health

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Depriving ourselves of food to the point of near-starvation doesn't sound very appealing, but it could prolong our lives and prevent the onset of age-related diseases. A combined analysis of two long-running studies shows that caloric restriction does indeed work in monkeys, hinting at its potential to work in humans. More research is needed before we can be sure this translates to humans, so you should probably avoid any drastic dietary measures for now.

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Pretty soon, your smart watch may know you're sick before you do, according to US scientists. The researchers made an app which tracked health data - such as heart rate and skin temperature - collected by 60 people's smart watches for up to two years, and found that people's stats changed when they were getting sick.

The authors say smart watches could also help detect the risk of type 2 diabetes and low oxygen on planes, and that they even helped detect Lyme disease in one of the scientists behind the study.

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I know that you want to get healthy this year, because it's the most popular New Year's resolution. Plenty of people want to help you, too, with everything from diet tips to exercise suggestions. They will tell you to make some lifestyle changes, to download a new app or even to buy a wearable fitness tracker (those probably don't work, by the way). But with lots of advice floating around, there are bound to be bad suggestions — those rooted in confirmation bias, trendiness and pretty much anything except scientific evidence.

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Neuroscienitsts have generally thought that babies are born with more tissue than their brains need, and that the body slowly dumps some of it as the brain develops. However, a new study shows that at least one part of the brain — the part that recognises faces — appears to develop in the opposite direction, increasing in complexity into adulthood.

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If you live less than 50 meters from a major road, you may be more likely to develop dementia.

That's what that results of a recent study looking at 6.6 million people has found, the first to investigate the link between living close to heavy traffic and the onset of major neurodegenerative diseases.

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I tingle just thinking about the full-body sensation accompanying a cotton bud exploring the inside of my ear canal. But the guilt-ridden pleasure is always followed by a nagging mother whisper: "Don't put anything smaller than your elbow into your ear!" Well, scientists have decided to amplify that whisper.

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We ate some weird stuff in 2016. A person born in the year 1000 AD definitely wouldn't comprehend a Dorito. He certainly wouldn't understand why kids love the taste of Cinnamon Toast Crunch, and if you showed him a Twinkie, he'd probably burn you at the stake. But the way things are headed, our food is bound to get a lot weirder.

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Back in the office today? Go check the fridge. It's fairly likely to at least have a carton of milk that expired on Boxing Day.

Apparently this is less than ideal, and the Food Safety Information Council is urging workers and employers to avoid food poisoning by taking care of "that much neglected workplace kitchen".

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Imagine reading a study from a prestigious science journal and finding out that the scientists performed and wrote the study as a joke. Sure, all of the data is true, but they littered the abstract and conclusion sections with irony. Other years you might have found it funny. But what if the joke was so arcane that only the scientist got it? And what if just minutes before you'd seen another fake news article denying climate change?

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Your night began at 10PM on New Year's Eve. Wow, what a long year it's been, you thought. Eager to begin pregaming your New Year's festivities and to forget your impending death, you took a shot of whiskey.