Tagged With globes

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If you have more air miles saved up than money in the bank, here's a clever way to keep track of every single country you've visited on your global travels. Basic origami skills are all that's needed to assemble this 3D cardboard globe featuring a gold foil outer layer that can be scratched off revealing the nations you've visited.

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= Jupiter is not only the largest planet in our solar system, it's also arguably the most stunning. Those massive storms — including that enormous red eye — produce quite an atmospheric show. And as a cheaper alternative to a giant telescope, this tiny desktop-sized version of Jupiter lets you stare in awe at the gas giant when you probably should be working.

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When Google Maps can deliver detailed views of the world with imagery that zooms right down to our backyards, they're can't be much demand for desk globes anymore. So a Japanese company called Gakken has taken its Worldeye globe to another level by turning it into a display that can show everything from weather patterns to stars.

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Yuri Suzuki has been travelling the world, using a dictaphone to collect local sounds of different countries since 2009. With these audio field notes, he's turned a globe into a record that plays these sounds when it spins for a 30-minute audio tour of the world called "The Sound of the Earth".

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Google Earth's an incredible (and incredibly useful) piece of software, but there's still something to be said for the good old, three-dimensional globe. This one not only celebrates the brass-detailed spheres of yore, but controls Google Earth for good measure.

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While only six inches in diameter, the $US50 City Lights Globe reminds us what Earth looks like at night, when the great oceans give way to the sparkle of cities (note: globe glows in full, not accurately).

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Have you ever wondered what type of plug they use in Nepal? Yeah, me too. UPDATE: Ooh, looks like they got China wrong. Don't use this map when visiting China!

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When I was a kid, I always loved those shorts on shows like Sesame Street or Mr. Rogers that went to factories to show how things like crayons were made. Seeing how stuff is made is totally fascinating! That's why I can't help but post this video on how globes are made. It's nothing earth shattering, but I bet you've never even thought about how they put them together. Well, now you know something you didn't know a few minutes ago. You're welcome.