Tagged With glasses

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For top runners, like the elite specimens competing in the Olympics, every last thing you wear needs to be engineered for comfort and speed. So Nike and Zeiss took inspiration from human anatomy for a new pair of sunglasses that wrap around an athlete's head.

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Video: It's pretty simple. The cornea and the lens needs to focus light right onto the retina in the back of the eye in order for us to see clearly. If our corneas and lenses are screwed up, it will pinpoint the light in front of or behind the retina, causing us to only be able to see what's right in front of us or what's really far away. Basically, slapping a pair of glasses on your eyes refocuses light so that it hits the retina, as it's supposed to. The prescription is adjusted to what you need.

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Video: I will freely admit to being one of the twentysomething wasters who will throw a cocktail in anything that isn't a Solo cup. But if you have more style and class, you may have wondered if there's science behind the bewildering array of glassware.

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There are countless reasons why it would be awesome to wear one of Tony Stark's Iron Man suits, not the least of which being the slick heads-up display providing info on targets and other nearby threats. But for just $US55 (instead of billions) these laser-etched glowing plastic shades provide a similar experience on the cheap.

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It's no secret that the whole 3D-thing didn't revolutionise the movie going experience — the second time around. But was it really because of expensive ticket prices, crappy 3D conversions, or more convenient home streaming options? Maybe. Or maybe it was because theatre-goers didn't have their choice of Avengers-themed 3D glasses.

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AVG is a name well-known in the Windows world for its decent and free anti-virus software, but the company is apparently looking to expand outside of just software and protect people's privacy in the real world now. At Mobile World Congress, AVG is demoing a concept pair of glasses that both foil facial recognition software, and make it difficult for someone to snap a photo of your face.

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I have a confession: I've been having out-of-body experiences. They feel like a video game. I'm a spirit in the sky, watching my flesh-and-bone self shamble about as I float on the breeze. How? Because I've been testing one of the coolest toys ever made: a tiny drone with a pair of wireless video goggles that let you see the world from high above.

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Most eyewear innovations these days involve the addition of tiny screens and cameras to turn your glasses into a 'smart' interface for your phone. But a company called REM Eyewear has actually come up with a clever way to improve the glasses themselves with a unique segmented hinge and cable system that helps them not only fit any sized head, but also stay put when worn.

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Ever heard of Ralph Osterhout? He's known as the real-life "Q". He created underwater vehicles featured in two James Bond movies. He's the guy who shrunk down night vision goggles to a size soldiers could afford to wear. He invented some of the most popular toys of the '90s, including the Yak Bak, the TalkBoy F/X+ and the gadget-filled Power Penz. And now, his Osterhout Design Group is back with a new Google Glass competitor.

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Just because you're handy with a hammer doesn't mean you have to look fashionably challenged while plying your trade. So leave it to Restoration Hardware to stock a pair of retro-styled horn-rimmed safety glasses to keep you looking chic while working on a construction site.

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All humans have a weakness, something they simply can't resist, and while that can vary from person to person, there's not a single human on the planet who can overcome the temptation of popping a sheet of bubble wrap. But attempting to pop this set of bubble wrap glasses will only lead to a trip to the emergency room.

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I spend too much of my waking life staring at screens. If you're reading this, you probably do too. So instead of putting things on or in front of our imperfect eyeballs to correct and protect them, how about rethinking the screens we're staring at? Researchers at Berkeley, MIT and Microsoft have developed a prototype that could one day make glasses or contacts obsolete — at least when you're looking at your phone or computer.

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Unless you stash them in a case when you're not wearing them, the arms on your glasses are free to flop and flail about, increasing the risk of them getting bent or broken. It's admittedly a first-world problem, but one that design studio Nendo has still solved with an improved nosepiece that now features a simple clip to secure the arms.