Tagged With generators

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Ever gone for a long bike ride in unfamiliar territory? Probably used your phone's GPS to help navigate, right? Convenient. However, that also makes running out of juice more than just a small annoyance. Siva Cycle's Atom might just solve that, and a host of other battery issues for the tech-bound biker.

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It's estimated that in the US alone there's over 225,000km of train tracks criss-crossing the country. So a team of researchers from New York's Stony Brook University has developed a simple railside generator that's able to convert the vibrations from a passing train into usable electricity.

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Swiss scientists designed a small blood-powered turbine that would fit in your arteries and power internal electronics like a pacemaker. Each turbine can produce 800 microwatts of energy which is far greater than the 10 microwatts used by a pacemaker.

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This seems like a harmless tube. In fact, it was harmless: Jewish farmers used the first version to scare birds from crop fields. Then, somebody converted it into a crowd dispersion mechanism. And then, they discovered it could kill.

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It's an alarmingly simple concept that claims to be the world's first application: Netherlands-based company Natuurcafé La Port installed a power generator into a revolving door. Fantastic, but it took us this long?

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Because I rarely drive these days, I still roll around in a car I bought 8 years ago. It runs fine, but sooner or later it is going to quit on me. I'll tell you what though, in my situation, the new addition to Duracell's Powerpack linuep looks like peace of mind in a lunch pail-sized box. In addition to jump starting your car, it can power up AC, DC and USB-powered electronics (340 W continuous / 450 W peak). It even has a voice feature that informs you on the estimated runtime for devices that you plug in as well as instructions on how to use its vehicle jump starter and air compressor (150 psi). All-in-all, the 450 looks one seriously useful device for your $US150.

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You may not like it now, but you would be thankful for that big butt of yours if you ever got a chance to ride a bike fitted with designer Deco Goodman's "Commuter Cyclist's Sustainable Energy Source." The device attaches underneath the seat and collects power generated by the compression of the seat springs, braking, pedaling etc. As a result, the electricity could be used to power headlights/taillights and any portable gadgets you bring with you on the road. As you might have guessed, it is only a concept at the moment, but at least it doesn't sound completely far-fetched.

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Impoverished Indian families can look into getting the e-charkha, an electricity-generating version of the ubiquitous yarn-making spinning wheel, as a way to increase productivity without a boost in energy costs. The e-charkha, designed by RS Hiremath, generates juice as the charkha spins and diverts it into a free battery at the bottom of the machine.

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Look, I'm no engineer. That's just not what I do. But these rough schematics of a high five power generator, which we see could fuel an entire sandwich shop, look pretty solid to me. After all, who couldn't use an extra high five to get them through the day? And who doesn't like a delicious sandwich? This one-two punch of sustainable happiness could usher in a better tomorrow. Though if such high fiving technology were to fall into the wrong hands...may God help us all. Concept by .