Tagged With gas

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Video: If watching dry ice sublimate is already one of life's pleasures, what can we call the joy of watching dry ice being submerged in water? Never seen it? Forgotten what it looks like? Well, watch this whole brick of dry ice get stuck underwater and check out how the carbon dioxide gas just bubbles up to the surface while forming a slithery, almost refractive layer around the dry ice. The dry ice almost takes an amorphous shape.

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Video: Watching dry ice sublimate (turn into gas instead of liquid) still manages to make me feel like a kid again. The kind of kid who is unsure of the difference between science and magic. OK, not quite ... I'm old now and it's impossible to ever look at things so innocently any more. But when I see the carbon dioxide gas immediately escape the frozen dry ice, I can't help but be entranced. Especially when it's shot up close like this.

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Video: It's flame retardant tinsel (which has absolutely no chance of standing up to the mighty red hot nickel ball), which probably explains why the smoke it releases looks so damn toxic. I mean, the smoke is so thick that it looks like it's a yellow green grey sludge and not actually smoke. Inhaling one puff of that smog's fart must knock you out cold and re-arrange your sense of smell for life.

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Contrary to popular belief, it's probably not methane leaking from behind that reckless "bros" light on fire (known as pyroflatulence); rather, it's most likely primarily hydrogen.

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They might look more like candy, but these micro-capsules are rather more special than that. Their shiny shell allows CO2 to pass straight through — where it can be trapped by a liquid held in their core.

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The practice of pricing fuel with a fraction of a penny is thought to have started around the 1930s. While we can't be sure who was the first to price fuel this way, it seems to have become relatively commonplace across the United States all the sudden around the same time. So what happened? In short- taxes and the Great Depression.

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Pittsburgh International Airport has seen better days. Saddled with debt from building now unused gates, the troubled airport is expanding into a completely different business: fracking. The airport will stay open as drillers tap the gas reserves underneath, thanks to a technique called horizontal drilling.

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If you live in an old city surrounded by history, chances are you also live with hundreds if not thousands of gas leaks all around you. It's bad for you (think explosions) and bad for the environment (think global warming), so we should probably do something about it. That's why Google Street View and the Environmental Defence Fund (EDF) have teamed up to map methane leaks in cities.