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We'll Always Be Able To Catch Pokemon At Fukushima

Pokemon GO is everywhere, and for some, that’s a problem.


What A Radioactive Town Looks Like Five Years After The Humans Left

Image Cache: Since March 2011, a 50km radius around the ruined Fukushima Daiichi reactor has been a designated exclusion zone, unsafe to travel. Over 100,000 evacuees left in a hurry and left behind a snapshot of what life looked like in the moments just before they fled. A brave soul recently snuck in to photograph the apocalyptic scene today.


Fukushima Is Now Home To Radioactive Wild Boars

After a nuclear disaster, wildlife tends to flourish in contaminated areas, unchecked by humans that might otherwise hunt them. In the forests around Fukushima, the population of radioactive wild boars are exploding.


Fukushima Farmers Are Using Soil Made From Polyester

It’s been five years since Japan’s Tohoku earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown in Fukushima — and some consumers are still wary of produce grown in the region. That’s why some farmers aren’t growing plants in soil that might be contaminated — they’re growing plants in polyester instead.


Japan Is Down To One Nuclear Power Plant

Japan has closed one of its two remaining operational nuclear plants. The shutdown comes just days before the fifth anniversary of a catastrophic earthquake that triggered a tsunami and the biggest nuclear meltdown since Chernobyl.


Fukushima Workers Don Their Protective Gear In These Eerie Portraits From The Exclusion Zone

Five years ago, a 9.0 undersea earthquake shook Japan. It was the most powerful earthquake ever recorded in the country, and it was followed by devastating tsunami waves, killing 15,894 people. The tsunami caused level 7 meltdowns at three reactors in the Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant complex, resulting in the largest nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl explosion.


Fukushima Reactor Debris Stands No Chance Against Toshiba's Slicing, Dicing Robot

It’s already been almost five years since the nuclear meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, and the inspection and clean-up is going to last decades. Our best weapon? Amazing robots, like this one Toshiba >announced on Monday.


Japan Fires Up Nuclear Power Again, But Can It Ever Be Safe Enough?

After two years without any nuclear power in response to the 2011 Fukushima earthquake, tsunami and subsequent nuclear crisis, Japan has restarted its first reactor, Sendai 1.


New 'Scorpion' Robot Will Inspect Fukushima Reactor

When the 2011 earthquake in Japan damaged the Fukushima nuclear power plant, teams scrambled to find a robot that could go where humans couldn’t. In many ways those robots failed, and ever since, there has been a focus on creating robots that can get the job done. Enter Toshiba’s “Scorpion” robot, which will make its way inside the power plant this August.


The Best Way To Map Radiation? Bento Boxes Stuffed With Geiger Counters

Back in 2011, a team of volunteers crammed Geiger counters into bento-shaped boxes to map the radiation following the Fukushima meltdown. It turned into the biggest collection of radiation data in history. Next up: tackling air pollution.


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