Tagged With feedback

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The electrode-equipped Galvanic Skin Response Bouquet doesn't give the couple much question about wearing their hearts on her sleeve: a blue LED glows when they're calm but a white one turns on when they becomes nervous. But that's not all.

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So I've been playing around with Google Wave for a while, and despite being on a few waves, have yet to find a really practical use for it. Until now - I want to use Wave as a way of chatting with you guys in real time - in particular as a way of getting feedback on the site.

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Haptic technology has the possibility to make touchscreens so much better, improving accuracy and adding a whole new range of sensory feedback. Immersion, primary developers of haptic technology, presented both a refined onscreen keyboard and an incredibly cheesy "Immersive Messaging" protocol at this year's All Things D conference.

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Today Best Buy launched "Blue Label"—a new line of electronic products developed directly from customer feedback. Shockingly, Best Buy discovered that consumers wanted laptops with "longer battery life, a thin and lightweight design, an illuminated keyboard, more optimal screen size and superior warranty support"—so they enlisted the help of HP and Toshiba to create an exclusive product that conformed to these specifications. HP delivered the Pavilion dv3510nr Notebook PC with a thickness of 3.6cm, backlit keyboard, 4 hours of battery life and a 13.3" LED-backlit WXGA display. Toshiba's Satellite E105-S1402 is also part of the lineup, which is interesting because there was no mention of Blue Label when it was first released. Both are priced at $US1199.

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Cowon's upcoming P5 will improve on their A3 and Q5W portable media players (which we've both reviewed) with the addition of a haptics touch-feedback feature. The rest is fairly similar: a 800x480 screen, FM radio, stereo Bluetooth, TV-out, stereo speakers, USB, extreme codec support and 40GB-80GB sizes. There will still be Wi-Fi, but you'll have to get it tacked on after the fact with a dongle. The Korean price is US$430ish by the end of the month. No US info yet as far as we know. Maybe we can trade them an early sneak peek at Starcraft 3 for this?

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Among the rush of Apple patents relating to touchscreens over the last year came one on tactile feedback touchscreens, and Nokia seems to have been thinking along the same lines. Almost exactly the same lines, since Nokia's Haptikos tech is a system of fluid-cells driven by piezoelectric actuators that push up through a flexible touchscreen. And that sounds a lot like Apple's sub-surface, adjustable tactile "keys." But apparently the Nokia tech is aimed at "variable and controllable user perceived surface roughness or friction coefficient" rather than buttons. Fascinating stuff, nevertheless.

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A team of Korean and US scientists have developed a new type of display that delivers information via your biggest organ: your skin (yes, I know what you were thinking.) Their new tactile "display" is flexible enough to be rolled up around your finger like a bandaid, and may be a useful computerised Braille aid. The device uses new precisely-arranged electroactive polymers, which expand when a voltage is applied applying gentle pressure to nearby skin. This, along with the fact it doesn't need complex electronics, means that it's the kind of tech that could easily end up in haptic-feedback data gloves or a "tele-feeling transferring system," which sounds *ahem* fascinating.

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Every week, Giz Explains breaks down sticky, chewy tech into easy-to-swallow bits, like a mama bird eating stuff and puking it back into her babies' mouths, already digested. We've covered stuff like scary plasma TVs and the image sensors in your digital camera. But what would you like us to explain? If there's something you'd like the quick, essential CliffsNotes on, send an email to [email protected] with "Giz Explains" line. We won't tell your friends you asked, honest.

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If a Palluxo.com source is to be believed, Apple is currently in talks with Immersion Corp. regarding haptic technology implementation for the iPhone. Immersion Corp. solutions have been implemented in Samsung handsets in the past and it now looks like Apple want in on the action. The conjecture gathers weight thanks to Clent Richardson, a former Apple executive that has just been appointed as Immersion Corporation's CEO.

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Do you really need that light on to not trip over your coffee table and break your leg? Let's find out, shall we? The Consumption Feedback Switch is a device that monitors your electricity usage. If it feels you're within your light quota when you flip on the lights, you'll see a small, harmless spark. But if you've been one of those dolphin-unsafe villains from Captain Planet, reading a few minutes too long at night, a gigantic stream of deadly electricity will mend your ways pending you not die.

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You know what would make gaming even more fun? Pain. Or at least that is what the folks at Mindwire would like you to think. Their new MindwireV5 unit helps you get into the action with sensations ranging from a "crashing car to the blast of a machine gun's multiple bullets hitting you; a sharp zap all the way through to a soft massaging feeling." Five self-adhesive pads are connected to the arms, legs and stomach which administer a range of electric shocks that create sensations that mimic in-game action.

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Also known as the 3rd Space Vest, the Force Feedback gaming vest from TMgames is filled with compressed air pouches in order for you to feel the pain when you're hooked up to your console and having your butt kicked by scary aliens. Compatible with around a dozen games, including Call of Duty, Doom 3, Quake 4 and Medal Of Honor, so if you want to feel what it's like to be knifed, shot, blown up or merely punched in the kidneys, you might think about shelling out US$169 for this. Or you could just go to the rough part of town and tell the scariest mofo you can find that you had sex with his mother last night.

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The "Constraint City" vest is a weird project by Austrian artist Gordan Savicic that's a sadistic type of WiFi detector. It's a vest, and as you get closer to WiFi hotspots, it gets tighter and tighter, causing discomfort and pain. The idea, according to Savicic, is to create "schizo-geographic pain map" of the wireless signals around us. OK. Perhaps it'd be better used to wean people off their Internet addictions, although I suppose you could just plug in and avoid the squeeze. Or, you know, just not put on the stupid vest in the first place.

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TN Game's 3rd Space Vest, designed by physician Mark Ombrellaro, is based on a earlier medical instrument that permitted doctors to carry out distance based investigations. As if there could be an even better use, Dr. Ombrellaro has modified the vest so gamers will be able to feel gaming impacts, such as punches and shots, by means of alternating air pressures that will simulate the sensations.

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Sebastian Ritzler, a design student in Germany, has created a feature-laden rolling white cane called the Mygo that will make the blind scoff at us eyesies. The Mygo uses a sensor-camera combo to measure the ground below it and give the user real time feedback via a wireless headset. The cane also ends in a small wheel that uses a steering engine that helps the user steer by providing feedback through the grip.

The Mygo is height-adjustable, tough, and waterproof — in case you're a blind swimmer — and runs on a lithium-ion battery that will keep it going for around 6 hours. It has yet to go into production but Ritzler is aiming to make it an affordable innovation, something in the $200 range, which, if it works as advertised, is a damn good deal.

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If you ditched your watch because you carry a phone around with a built-in clock, but are sick of pulling your phone out every time you want to check the time, you should check out this Haptic Clock. It's a small program for Java phones that tells you the time through a series of vibrations, allowing you to keep your phone in your pocket.

Simply reach in your pocket and hit the 5 key to get it to tell you the time. How does it tell it to you?

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Well, not quite a carpet, but of all the interactive floor screens I've seen, this makes the rest look like dinky toys. It's a plaything too, which is great. All about delivering a "social audiovisual immersive experience" for nightclub goers, and an amazing new toy for VJs to work with. If you're going to be in Tokyo (surprise, surprise), go check this action out.

Visualux

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Remember the Pantech IM-R200 double LCD phone with touchscreen keys? You know, the one that gives you tactile feedback on the touchscreen so you can actually see what's going on? AVING hassome nicer pictures of the screen, showing off various styles of keypads that you can change to.

We're hoping there's more than just keypad styles on the touchscreen—maybe some kinda QWERTY or something—but we do see that it looks different when a call is in effect. Head over to check out more pics.

Bonus shot after the jump.