Tagged With fda

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EpiPen, the life-saving allergy product, is now a $US1 billion ($1.3 billion) a year business for Mylan, a drug company that's currently enduring a wave of bad publicity over the extraordinary surge in US EpiPen pricing. In 2007, an EpiPen in the US cost about $US57 ($75). Today that price has skyrocketed to over $US600 ($787) — all for about $1 worth of injectable medicine.

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A growing number of businesses are offering whole body cryotherapy, telling customers it can treat everything from asthma and Alzheimer's right through to insomnia and arthritis. The US Food and Drug Administration is finally speaking out on the practice, saying there's no evidence to back the many purported benefits — and that it's actually quite dangerous.

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In the right hands, broken electronics can be turned into something useful again. But useful isn't the best way to describe Drake Anthony's 200-watt laser bazooka made from a bunch of old DLP projectors that he bought off eBay. Words like incredibly "dangerous", "do-not-try-this-at-home" or "are you crazy?" seem more appropriate.

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Though it bears some resemblance to a Tim and Eric sketch, the AspireAssist is a very real medical device, approved by the US FDA for installation in people 22 or older "with a body mass index of 35 to 55, and who have failed to achieve and maintain weight loss through non-surgical weight-loss therapy". It allows patients to drain predigested food from their stomachs into a nearby toilet.

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You may have noticed a subtle change on your food ingredients list. Big, bad sugar is being replaced by the fresher, greener sounding evaporated cane juice. But how does this ingredient differ from sugar? It doesn't, says the FDA.

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Tracking food poisoning cases is laborious detective work, and sometimes the culprit is never revealed. Now the task of identifying sources of contamination could be even harder — and, paradoxically, it's because of a test designed to diagnosis food poisoning faster and easier than ever before.