Tagged With experiments

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Video: Skittles' "taste the rainbow" tagline seems all the more appropriate when you arrange the colourful lollies in a ring on a plate and pour hot water over them. They immediately begin to melt and bleed colour, producing a rainbow design that's straight up magical without the need for a wand.

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Video: Gallium is one of those rare metals that turns to a liquid somewhere above room temperature, allowing you to do fun experiments — like pouring it onto a vibrating speaker while playing music — without risking severe burns. Point a camera at the results and that fun science experiment suddenly feels like you've discovered a distant alien world bubbling to life out of the fabric of the cosmos.

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Video: It's called the Schlieren effect and it means that you can see things that are invisible to the human eye, like changes in air density. So when you turn on a hair dryer, you can see the blast of air it shoots out. When you open a can of Coke, you can see what's escaping into the air. When you rub your hands, you can see the heat surrounding them.

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Video: Throw dry ice in everything just to see what happens, if you ask me. Crazy Russian Hacker put dry ice in some green slime and a bunch of bubbles started forming out of nowhere. The bubbles eventually pop in a small explosion of smoke but when they first appear underneath that muck of green goo, it's like seeing eggs spawn or something.

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Video: Liquid nitrogen is an endless source of fun. You can freeze things and smash things into pieces. Or you could pour it onto things and then watch the smoke monster move around and then smash things into pieces. Or you could dunk things in it and then watch the smoke disappear and then smash things into pieces. You get the point.

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Ah, in a tale as old as ice and fire, here's a liquid nitrogen 'squirt gun' versus a flamethrower. The Backyard Scientist outfitted a liquid nitrogen canister with a release valve that basically turns liquid nitrogen into a freeze ray death weapon of sorts (as in, the pressure makes the liquid nitrogen shoot out pretty strong). He pitted it up against a flame thrower to see how long it would take the liquid nitrogen shooter to win and it's quite the battle.

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Video: Here's a silly fun experiment to do the next time you're at the Hoover Dam: try and pour a bottle of water over the dam. Instead of flowing downward like water almost always does, the water actually flies up and flows upward because of the super strong draft.

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This doesn't mean you should stop being helpful or charitable to homeless people you encounter on the street — but if you see this guy, there's something about him you should know. At a recent Maker Faire in Nantes, France, a man wearing worn clothing and pushing a shopping cart actually turned out to be a lifelike robotic hobo, or robo, as they prefer to be called.

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Video: Growing up on Earth you learn from a very young age that liquids will remain in a cup as long as it stays upright. But Steve Mould demonstrates a liquid that laughs at gravity and other forces that govern our universe: Polyethylene oxide. It's a polymer made from long chains of molecules that allow it to pour itself out of a container — even if it's not tipped over.

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As far as building materials go, they don't come much cheaper than dirt, which is literally everywhere and mostly free. But, as anyone who has ever made a sand castle knows, soil isn't terribly strong and has a habit of forming a shallow pile rather than more structurally-beneficial shapes. We're going to let you in on a little secret — making dirt super strong is incredibly easy.

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Video: Other than youth, recess, holidays, nap time, lollies, junk food, energy, a fast metabolism, hope, excitement, bubbles, being with your friends every single day, first memories, playgrounds, no worries and probably a million other things, one of the things that you miss about being a kid when you're an adult is the lack of silly science experiments. Sometimes you just want to put some food colouring on a plate and make it blow away with some dish soap. You don't want to know the science behind it, you just want to see a volcano explode.