Tagged With england

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Archaeologists in Britain have uncovered the charred remains of a 3000-year-old stilted wooden structure that plunged into the river after it caught fire. The remarkably well-preserved roundhouse is offering an unprecedented glimpse into what domestic life was like during the Bronze Age.

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England's version of Big Foot or just the logical result of new laws that forced exotic pet owners to free their animals in the 1970s? One thing's for sure: reported sightings of big cats are on the rise in the UK, while new studies seek to prove their existence.

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In 1815, William Smith drew a map of the United Kingdom which transformed the scientific landscape: It laid the foundations for modern geology, and identified natural resources which would beget the Industrial Revolution. But up until last year, this first-edition copy was considered to be lost forever.

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A dumping ground for nuclear waste located near the British coast is "virtually certain" to be washed away by rising sea levels, a new report warns. The UK Environment Agency has admitted that constructing the Drigg Low-Level Waste Repository so near the coast was a mistake, and that one million cubic metres of nuclear waste will begin leaking into the ocean "a few hundred to a few thousand years from now".

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So clever, so depressing: the English town of Clifton, having dwindled in economic strength over the years, has responded to the loss of its last place to shop with a giant vending machine. The so-called Speedy Shop — really, an oversized, building-shaped machine standing alone in a dreary parking lot — is meant to help bring some economic life back to the town.

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After the Thames River weaves eastward through London, it widens into an industrial landscape of factories sretching out into the English Channel. London-based photographer Alice Gur-Arie has documented this landscape in her series Passages: Industry on the River Thames, a collection of beautiful black and white photographs depicting the hulking structures that rely on the river for survival.

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In today's Observer, architecture editor Rowan Moore explores Europe's largest infrastructure project: London's new Crossrail line. Moore explains that, in addition to such factors as cost, miles, tons of dirt moved, and other construction superlatives, Crossrail also "claims to be the largest archaeological site in Britain, an inadvertent probe through a plague pit, a Roman road, a madhouse cemetery, a Mesolithic 'tool-making factory.'"

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Beautiful beaches probably aren't the first thing that come to mind when thinking of jolly olde England, but seaside resorts have been popular getaways for city-dwellin' Brits for nearly two centuries. People do still go visit, but the Victorian-era piers that dot the coast have seen some better days.