Tagged With economics

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Nearly one-third of drugs in development ultimately fail during clinical trials because the side effects are just too severe. Researchers at Cornell University have developed a promising new AI tool that better predicts which drug candidates are likely to be too toxic — and it's based on the Oakland A's winning strategy, immortalised in the blockbuster book and movie Moneyball.

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This year marks the 50th anniversary of the hugely popular sci-fi franchise Star Trek — arguably one of the profoundly influential fictional series of the last century. It's also the 500th anniversary of Sir Thomas More's classic work, Utopia, offering his vision of an ideal society. For Manu Saadia, that's a fitting coincidence: "The world of Star Trek is an economic Utopia."

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The USDA has released an update to its "food dollar" breakdown — a division of a single dollar into the exact amount every link in the chain receives. So what's new in the latest data from 2014, over last year's update? There's a series of changes, all of which seem to trend towards the same point: America is cooking for itself less and less.

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Fleeing violence and starvation in their native country, the refugees arrived in their new home only to be ridiculed in the press, subject to overt racism, and faced with persecution in their places of worship. Sound like recent headlines? This was the reality for the first Irish refugees to come to the US. It hasn't gotten much better in the last 150 years, either in the US or around the world.

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A recent survey from Pew Research found that 18-34 year-olds in the US are living with their parents for much longer than any generation since the 1960s. 43% of men and 37% of women in this age group are living at home. Commentators on last night's PBS News Hour called it "the new normal." But it's actually the same old normal. The idea of moving out has been an aberration for decades.

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Is it possible to be Batman? OK, better question, who could afford the technology to be Batman? Could we even make much of what we see being used by Batman in the Dark Knight movies?

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In the heart of downtown Montreal, between a boarded-up bar and a poutine shop, there's a three-story glass building. It looks for all the world like realtor's office — that is until you spot the sign swaying in the wind: "Bitcoin Embassy".

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Two weeks ago, I sold my car. It was a great car: a 2002 Subaru WRX with 36,700 miles. It did 0-60 in 5.9 seconds (and I'd tested it out enough times to appreciate that). Super fun. Carried groceries and anything I needed. Good for city, good for climbing and camping trips. Worked well. Nothing wrong with it.

Good riddance.

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Our ruthless new era of super-efficient global shipping has made it irrelevant. The new product is called — hold your boos until the end, please — iBubble Wrap. It's a version of an unpoppable wrap that's been around for a few years, but as an interesting story by the Wall Street Journal's Loretta Chao explains today, now it's being introduced by Sealed Air Corp: The original makers of bubble wrap.

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It's an unprecedented move in higher education, but a welcome one. The US Secretary of Education has pledged to forgive the loans of as many as 350,000 students who were defrauded into taking on huge student loan debts by online schools owned by Corinthian Colleges. More students may also be eligible.

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US telecommunication companies were up in arms in February after the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) made net neutrality the law of the land by classifying broadband internet as a utility, seeming to ensure there would be no pay-to-play fast lanes.