Tagged With ecology

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In case you thought we'd figured out life in the oceans even a little bit, a new study published in Nature Communications sets the record straight. For the first time, scientists have found experimental evidence of underwater pollination. There are bees in the sea — or at least creatures that perform the same kind of work.

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As Charles Darwin showed nearly 150 years ago, species can adapt to changing environmental conditions through the trial-and-error process of natural selection. A discouraging new study shows that climate change is happening too fast for evolution to keep up, placing countless plant and animal species at risk.

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This microscopic diplonemid doesn't look like much, but it's one of the most abundant single-celled hunters in the ocean. Researchers from the University of British Columbia have become the first to identify and photograph this surprisingly elusive — but ecologically important — sea creature.

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It isn't enough to halt global warming, but carbon-hungry plants are helping impede the buildup of CO2 in our atmosphere to a measurable degree, a new study has found. While this is a good thing and you should go thank a tree right now, the effect is probably temporary, speaking to how damn complicated our planet's response to climate change is going to be.

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Each year, around 6,000 birds are incinerated after chasing bugs within the Ivanpah concentrated solar thermal plant in the California Mojave Desert. Officials at the facility are enacting all sorts of measures to prevent this ongoing avian massacre — but it's not clear if anything's working.

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It's a scorching midsummer day, and the sawgrass is still under a pale blue sky. Waist-deep in water and sinking slowly into the muck, I fend off mosquitoes as a man from South Florida's Water Management District mixes a bag of salt into a hot tub-sized bucket on the side of the road. Nine metres away in the marsh, another city official wearing waders and a bug hat stands on a narrow steel walkway, dangling the end of a long hose over a plexiglass chamber.

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It doesn't have towering canopies or jewel-toned corals, but an enormous region of the eastern Pacific that was long considered a biological wasteland is proving to be anything but. New research reveals that the Clarion Clipperton Zone (CCZ), which is being prospected for deep ocean mining, is teeming with never-before-seen forms of life.

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Hundreds of millions of years ago, a tiny green microbe joined forces with a fungus, and together they conquered the world. It's a tale of two cross-kingdom organisms, one providing food and the one other shelter, and it's been our touchstone example of symbiosis for 150 years. The trouble is, that story is nowhere near complete.