doj

Fact Vs Fiction: The 225-Year-Old All Writs Act And Encryption

Following recent reports in the Wall Street Journal and Ars Technica, there’s been new interest in the US government’s use of a relatively obscure law, the All Writs Act.


Facebook: The DEA Can't Use Fake Profiles To Chase Suspects

Remember how the US Justice Department decided it was just fine for a Drug Enforcement Administration agent to steal a woman’s identity and set up a fake Facebook account to chase subjects? Well, Facebook’s not OK with that.


US Justice Department: It Was OK For A Federal Agent To Impersonate This Woman On Facebook

An overlooked US Justice Department court filing explains that a federal agent had the right to commandeer a woman’s identity, set up a fake Facebook account using her details and even post provocative photographs of her found on a seized phone. Buzzfeed reports that a Drug Enforcement Administration agent stole the identity of Sondra Arquiett, who then went by the name Sondra Prince, back in 2010.


US Authorities Seize Domains Over Android App Piracy For The First Time

Android’s free-wheeling, open ecosystem has a major app piracy problem, and the US government just got involved in a big way. Yesterday, the Department of Justice announced that it had seized the domains of three popular destinations for illegal Android downloads. Applanet, Appbucket and Snappzmarket are now dead.


Kim Dotcom: Please, Bring Us To America

We reported earlier that the legal proceedings in the case against Megaupload kingpin Kim Dotcom have been delayed to March 2013. And it seems Dotcom is none too pleased about this latest turn.


US Appeals Court Rules Computer Code Is Not 'Property' And Can't Be Stolen

Sergey Aleynikov, an ex-Goldman-Sachs programmer, spent a year in prison for downloading source code of the firm’s high-speed trading software before his sentence was overturned in February. Today the court explained why — downloading computer code doesn’t constitute stealing under the US National Stolen Property Act.


Feds Want To Warrantlessly Track Phones Bought With Fake Names

If the US Department of Justice gets its way, it won’t need a warrant to monitor people who buy mobile phones and other electronic services using a fake name, according to a story in today’s Wall Street Journal.


US DOJ Wants To Outlaw Lying On The Internet

It’s a cornerstone of the internet. The fake identity. And now CNET reports that the US Department of Justice wants to make it illegal to use a false identity on Facebook or lie about your weight on dating sites. You’re kidding right?


US Government Taking A Closer Look At Google-Motorola Deal

When ginormous companies try to buy gigantic companies, there’s always cries about monopolies, anti-trustiness and all those nasty words. So it’s really no surprise that the Department of Justice is now making a “second request” for more information about Google swallowing Motorola.


American Online Poker Is Under Attack Again

Last Friday, the US Department of Justice unveiled a 52-page (52? LOL) indictment against three of the biggest online poker companies providing service for Americans – PokerStars, Full Tilt Poker and Absolute Poker – and alleged that they were guilty of money laundering, along with wire and bank fraud.