Tagged With dice

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Like giant Koi in a pond who've grown larger than their goldfish siblings trapped in a bowl, this set of six over-sized wooden dice is designed to be tossed around in your spacious backyard. They say everything is better when it's super-sized, right? So playing with Yahtzee with five of these dice might actually come close to being actually fun.

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You can already get beloved board games like Monopoly on your tablet that provide a somewhat similar experience to the original cardboard sets. But they'll never fully replace those old versions, because they lack the tangible satisfaction of grabbing a pair of dice, going through your shaking ritual and tossing them across the table — oh wait, what's that? Scosche just released a set of wireless dice that work with tablets and smartphones? (Throws Monopoly in the garbage.)

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If you assumed nobody could top a classic D20 for sheer nerd equity, you assumed wrong. Builder Itay—who confesses he is new to Dungeons & Dragons—thought he'd improve the sport by cobbling a variable-number die out of two 5×7 led displays, a Freescale accelerometer and love.

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This Dice game is by far the coolest game I've seen, and it's got amazing tech inside which takes advantage of the iPhone's sensors like no other app. Here's how it works: You shake the iPhone and it rolls the dice inside, which you use to play poker. But instead of using some dumb random number generator, it captures your hand's motion and rolls simulated collisions between the virtual dice. This game is great but its just a sampling of the tech from Fullpower, the company Philippe Kahn, creator of the camera phone in 1997, has been developing in stealth for 5 years until today. Yes, this is the tip of a giant iceberg full of gadgets exactly aware of what we're doing with them at all times.

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We can only guess what the ancient Romans might have thought about the latest revision of the Dungeons and Dragons rulebook (super approachable; they'd love it!), but we do know they were gamers. That's because an incredibly old, incredibly valuable Roman glass d20 was sold at auction by the famous Christie's auction house. For US$17,925. Historians know the symbols are Roman, but have yet to figure out which game for which it was used. Any guesses, Gizmodo readers/ancient gaming history buffs?

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I'm in conflict over this new "pimp your ride" car toy. Firstly, the old-fashioned fluffy, dangly rear-view mirror dice were never cool, unless they were an ironic statement. And secondly, I kinda liked them anyway. This 21st Century version, the "Rainbow Dice-Shaped Lamp", is just one die and, sure, it glows in seven fantastic colours when plugged into the cigarette-lighter socket. But where's the fluffiness? Where's the retro-chic? Humph. If your sense of style isn't offended, it's available for US$19.

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Jaehyung Hong, the the same designer that developed the Bluetooth lanyard we showed you earlier, has a slightly simpler design for us. This time it's a set of keyboard dice assembled from the keys of an old keyboard. Each side of the die has a specific key that would correlate to any set of game rules. But don't expect to be taken seriously if you try to drop these in a heated alley dice game. Check the close-up image for more dicey detail.

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The DIY PC enthusiasts among you (we used to be one, years ago, before we got an actual job) know what a crapshoot it is upgrading bits and pieces of your rig to stay up to date with the latest games. With these PC Dice, however, you can take all the guesswork out of what components need to be upgraded. Just take the dice, which have operating systems on one die, parts/problems on another, and solutions on a third, and roll to see what your next step is. $27 a set means they're actually cheaper than most components you can purchase for a computer anyway, which makes for a great Xmas present for your favourite computer nerd.

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newVideoPlayer("diceroll_gawker.flv", 475, 376);In a huge promotional event, online gambling site Gnuf has helicopter-dropped a pair of giant dice down a mountain in Nuuk, Greenland. Standing about 7 feet tall and weighing in at around 1,200 pounds a pop, each die was constructed like a tank, with its steel frame enclosed by steel sheets, all protecting its surely steel heart. And while we can't condone gambling, we can condone airlifting deadly gigantic dice to be haphazardly flung down a mountainside. You know, purely in the name of scientific interest or an especially slow game of Monopoly.

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newVideoPlayer("dicestacking3_gawker.flv", 475, 376); When we posted an unexpectedly well-received video of dice stacking yesterday, little did we realise that this peculiar activity has been developed into an artform by some amazing magicians. Here's a new dice stacking video from Thomas Fischbach, the same guy we saw in the video update yesterday. For those of you who thought this was all a camera trick, Fischbach shows us his moves in ultra-slow motion. That's some awfully quick sleight-of-hand right there.

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This has to be one of the weirder combos we've seen, but Ricardo sent in this picture of a tube of glue that comes free with a dice game in his Portuguese supermarket. We know whenever we have to do some home repair we always wish we had some dice to throw around, and we definitely know that whenever we're playing dice, we wish we had glue handy.