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The Next Big War Will Be Digital -- And We're Not Ready For It

In the 21st century the familiar form of warfare in which physical damage is meted out against the opponent’s military forces and infrastructure has become only one form of attack. Instead, states are increasingly launching non-lethal attacks against an enemy’s information systems — this is the rise of information warfare.

The US Military Used Lasers To Shoot Down A Drone In 1973

Lasers are the future of warfare. So it might come as a surprise to many Americans that the US military first used a laser to shoot a drone out of the sky as early as 1973.

These Paratroopers Look So Peaceful While They're In The Air

Image Cache: Heads up! If you were anywhere near San Gregorio in Spain on November 4, you could have seen a slew of American paratroopers emerge from the back of a C-17 Globemaster III and drift serenely down to Earth.

It's No Secret That The US Government Uses Zero Days For 'Offence'

Little by little, the US government is opening up about its use of computer security vulnerabilities. Last month, the NSA disclosed that it has historically “released more than 91% of vulnerabilities discovered in products that have gone through our internal review process and that are made and used in the United States.” There should probably be an asterisk or four accompanying that statement. But more on that in a minute. First, it’s worth examining why the government is being even the slightest bit forthcoming about this issue.

State Department Decides Not To Classify 'Cyber Products' As 'Munitions'

This week, the US Department of State’s Defence Trade Advisory Group (DTAG) met to decide whether to classify “cyber products” as munitions, placing them in the same export control regime as hand grenades and fighter planes. Thankfully, common sense won out and the DTAG recommended that “cyber products” not be added to the control list. EFF and Access Now filed a brief joint statement with the DTAG urging this outcome and we applaud the DTAG’s decision.

Restoring A Ship's Hull Still Looks Like Something From Centuries Past

Image Cache: It looks like ribbons of paper peeling off the surface of the wall — but in fact Seaman Jorge Ortiz here is prying copper sheet away from the hull of the USS Constitution as he helps restore the ship.

This Is How You Can Learn To Control A Submarine Engine On Land

Image Cache: Learning to control a submarine is not straightforward. But these days, the Navy doesn’t need to build as many large-scale physical simulators — because much of it can be achieved on-screen.

NYT: U.S. Officials Worried About Russia Cutting Undersea Data Cables

The New York Times reports that Russia has a series of submarines and spy-ships “aggressively operating” close the the undersea cables that carry the bulk of the world’s internet communications.

Even Soldiers Have To Wait For Computers To Reboot

It’s not quite the Blue Screen of Death, but it’s still a pain in the arse. Over in the US, Technical Sergeant Cody L. Canfield from the Illinois Air National Guard’s 169th Air Support Operations Squadron has to wait while his training software reboots.

Syria Is Becoming A Test Bed For High-Tech Weapons Of Electronic Warfare

The relationship between Russia and the West is becoming increasingly dangerous with potential flashpoints developing in both eastern Europe and Syria. After repeated incursions into Turkish airspace by Russian warplanes on bombing raids over Syria, NATO’s secretary general Jens Stoltenberg warned Moscow that it stands ready to “defend all allies”. Meanwhile Britain announced it would send troops to Baltic states to defend NATO’s eastern boundaries against possible Russian aggression beyond Ukraine.

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