curiosity

Inside NASA: From 3D Printing Spacecraft To Augmenting Humanity Itself

What does the guy charged with kitting out NASA and the Jet Propulsion Lab do all day? He has to provide tech for the smartest people on the planet, and buy gadgets to enable the next-generation of space-flight. Despite the lofty job description, Tom Soderstrom has still found time to enable a 3D-printed spacecraft, and hopes to one day augment the way our brains work using technology. Get ready for blast-off.

All The Stuff We Never Actually Found On Mars

For as long as we’ve been snapping pics on the surface of Mars, we’ve been claiming to see anything and everything in its dusty, red terrain. Look at that blur; is that the silhouette of a lady Martian? A rogue military helmet from World War I? An actual human finger? Nope! It’s a rock. It’s always a rock.


Curiosity Snaps Cool Closeup Photo Of Its Damaged Tyre

Curiosity snapped this cool closeup of its wheel on Mars soil last week. You can see the bumps and damage the tyre.


Curiosity Found Spikes In Methane That Could Signal Life On Mars

Ever since Curiosity landed on Mars, it has been in search of methane. It couldn’t find any for years, until a new set of experiments unveiled today that detected large spikes in methane. Scientists have no idea what caused the spikes, but the most intriguing explanation is “life on Mars.”


Humans' Inherent Curiosity Stems From A Long, Protracted Childhood

Curiosity is one of our most basic traits and we have a lot to thank for it. Without the primal urge to always want to see what lies over the next hill, or the other the ocean, or beyond the confines of our atmosphere, humans would still be living — quite literally — in the stone age. In Curious: The Desire to Know and Why Your Future Depends On It, author Ian Leslie (@mrianleslie) explains how and why our need to discover really is second nature. The following is an excerpt from the book.


At Last, Mars Curiosity Finally Reaches Its Destination

This is it. Curiosity has reached its prime destination. After a brilliant conception, an amazing landing, and two years of continuous travel, the rover is now at the base of Aeolis Mons — aka Mount Sharp — a mountain that rises 5.5km at the center of Gale Crater. This is where the real fun begins.


Why Has Curiosity Slowed Down Its Course During Its First Mars Year?

The Mars Curiosity Rover has completed its first Mars year in the Red Planet — 687 Earth days exploring and drilling on its way to its first destination — Murray Buttes. Overall, it’s been a Mars year full of successes, even if we haven’t found proof of life in Mars yet. But the rover has slowed down significantly. Why?


Curiosity Took Hundreds Of Microbes To Mars -- And Many May Still Be Alive

Despite the best efforts of NASA, it’s impossible to put craft into space that are entirely clean. Now, a study shows that Curiosity was sent up to Mars with 377 strains of microbes aboard — and up to 11 per cent may have made it to the surface of the red planet.


Weird, Bright Light Spotted On Mars

Do you see it? There’s a little beacon of light in the photograph of Mars above. It’s on the left side of the photo, and it’s pretty darn bright. What could it be? More importantly, what do we want it to be? A Martian signal keeping track of the Curiosity rover? An alien laser beam? A key to a secret portal in the universe? A superhero?


Mars Curiosity Having Fun Driving On Dunes

This is fun. NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover driving over dunes in Mars. Check out the view from the back, after going through all that sand.