curiosity

Curiosity Has Found Nitrates Important For Life On Mars

Samples obtained by NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars have been analysed and shown to contain nitrogen compounds, that are a source of nutrients for living things.


NASA Has Halted Curiosity's Work To Investigate A Short Circuit

NASA engineers are currently investigating a short circuit that has occurred aboard Curiosity. The Mars rover is not carrying out any further work until the fault is diagnosed.


Check Out The New (And Coolest) Mars Curiosity Panorama Selfie

Bravo NASA for capturing this new cool Mars Curiosity selfie on the surface of Mars at its new research site, the Mojave. NASA made this image by combining dozens of photos taken during January 2015. Here is the annotated version, so you can see the sites that the rover visited before reaching this point.


Curiosity's New Software Lets It Drill More Gently (And Do Less Damage)

Curiosity can be heavy handed. Its drill, used to investigate geological samples on Mars, has frequently broken the rocks that NASA scientists have wanted to peer inside. But a new software update means that now it can go more gently with with its drill.


NASA's Curiosity Rover Looks Like A Tiny Rivet On Mars' Surface

Do you see it? That incredibly tiny dot in the center of that blue perimeter. That is NASA’s $US2.5 billion rover, steadily working away and analysing the Martian soil. This image was captured on Dec. 13, 2014 by the HiRISE camera housed inside NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.


Inside NASA: From 3D Printing Spacecraft To Augmenting Humanity Itself

What does the guy charged with kitting out NASA and the Jet Propulsion Lab do all day? He has to provide tech for the smartest people on the planet, and buy gadgets to enable the next-generation of space-flight. Despite the lofty job description, Tom Soderstrom has still found time to enable a 3D-printed spacecraft, and hopes to one day augment the way our brains work using technology. Get ready for blast-off.

All The Stuff We Never Actually Found On Mars

For as long as we’ve been snapping pics on the surface of Mars, we’ve been claiming to see anything and everything in its dusty, red terrain. Look at that blur; is that the silhouette of a lady Martian? A rogue military helmet from World War I? An actual human finger? Nope! It’s a rock. It’s always a rock.


Curiosity Snaps Cool Closeup Photo Of Its Damaged Tyre

Curiosity snapped this cool closeup of its wheel on Mars soil last week. You can see the bumps and damage the tyre.


Curiosity Found Spikes In Methane That Could Signal Life On Mars

Ever since Curiosity landed on Mars, it has been in search of methane. It couldn’t find any for years, until a new set of experiments unveiled today that detected large spikes in methane. Scientists have no idea what caused the spikes, but the most intriguing explanation is “life on Mars.”


Humans' Inherent Curiosity Stems From A Long, Protracted Childhood

Curiosity is one of our most basic traits and we have a lot to thank for it. Without the primal urge to always want to see what lies over the next hill, or the other the ocean, or beyond the confines of our atmosphere, humans would still be living — quite literally — in the stone age. In Curious: The Desire to Know and Why Your Future Depends On It, author Ian Leslie (@mrianleslie) explains how and why our need to discover really is second nature. The following is an excerpt from the book.