Tagged With cube

0

This "Trash Cube", designed by Nicolas Le Moigne, uses leftover roofing material to make up its shape. When workers throw scrap fibre cement away, they toss it into a cube-shaped mold to form the seat. Recycling is useful.

0

newVideoPlayer( {"type":"video","player":"http://www.youtube.com/v/Zqj0QrVcBmo&hl=en&fs=1&hd=1","customParams": ,"width":500,"height":332.5,"ratio":0.615,"flashData":"","embedName":null,"objectId":null,"noEmbed":false,"source":"youtube","wrap":true,"agegate":false} ); Somebody got the bright idea to shrink a Rubik's cube down to 10mm—that's less than half an inch. The cube is fully functional too, so for fat fingered dummies like me, it's that much more impossible to solve. Thanks.

0

The Interactive Colour Cube doesn't do anything per se, other than change colour based upon its angle of rotation. Three accelerometers each control a different axis (X, Y, and Z) which directly correlate with either a red, blue or green set of internal LEDs (that "float" in a cube within the cube). The result is a logical, dynamic light show as you rotate the device. Here's a clip:

7

Rubik's Cubes are nice if you actually want to think, but how about for those times when you're just sitting there and you want something to fiddle with? The Neocube has 216 spherical neodymium magnets that connect and make a cube, a sphere, or any other obscene shape that springs to mind. Show me a man who doesn't like playing with magnets and I'll show you a man I don't much care for. All yours for just US$34.95. Bonus video after the jump.

1

Seekway has put together this spectacular 3D LED display, which is capable of displaying images in full 3D (duh) at an amazing, 30 fps. The prototype consists of a 16 x 16 x 16 grid of interconnected colour LEDs and if our mathematics doesn't fail us, that's 4096 individual diodes. We're sure you'll agree; it looks amazing, but the video is even more fantastic, so jump in.

0

Could you imagine if you had to solve a Rubik's cube every time you had to access your email? Your Google Groups friends would call you up in about a week wondering if you died. Cheng-Li Hung thinks differently, and designed up this rather cool-looking (and slightly simplified) Rubik's security system. To secure your computer, just set up a colour combination that only you know. "Solve" the cube for your colour combo and you're back in. You can even set a time limit so people can't just guess. Neat idea, but it's too impractical to work.

0

Nobody really knows what the future of human interfaces and gaming will look like, but Andrew Fentem—who went from working on classified missile systems to developing multi-touch human interfaces, kinetic surfaces and motion sensing technologies before almost anyone else in the planet—gave us a fascinating vision on where we are headed in this exclusive interview. Work like his Fentix Cube, a motion- and touch-sensing cube which can play Pac-Man among other games, have all the big companies taking notes. The videos speak for themselves.