Don't Spread That Facebook Copyright Takedown Bullshit

This week, you may have noticed a surge in Facebook friends posting an alarmist message on their walls insisting that they won’t give Facebook permission to use and distribute the content they post. The message is either the same or very similar to another viral copy-and-paste that has circulated on the social network for the past few years. It’s 2015, but there’s the same old complete misunderstanding of intellectual property law being spread around.


Copyright Holders Asked Google To Remove 345 Million Links Last Year 

Copyright holders were not shy about asking Google to remove pirated content in 2014. Last year, there were over 345 million requests to take down infringing content, according to a Torrent Freak summary of Google’s weekly transparency reports. That’s a 75 per cent increase from 2013. Google honoured most of the requests.


Sony Leak: The Secret Meetings That Set Hollywood's Anti-Piracy War Plan

Every year, legal representatives from seven of the biggest movie studios in the country gather in Sherman Oaks, California, to talk about all things anti-piracy. This isn’t surprising; it’s their livelihood, after all. But what does leaves a sour taste in your mouth is their plan to spread the DMCA-dispensing gospel with shadowy back room dealings and skewed facts.


It's Perfectly Legal To Tell People How To Remove DRM

Telling users how to strip the DRM from their legally purchased ebooks is not contributory copyright infringement, according to a ruling last month by a federal judge in New York.


Google News Is Closing In Spain Because Of Copyright Law

Google has announced that it will be permanently shutting down the Spanish version of Google News, effective from December 16, 2014. The shutdown comes in direct response to amendments to the Spanish intellectual property law (Ley De Propiedad Intelectual) imposing a compulsory fee for the use of snippets of text to link to news articles, by online news aggregators that provide a search service.


Sharing Night-Time Photos Of The Eiffel Tower Is Illegal

Here’s a fun but depressing Sunday evening fact: taking and sharing photos of the Eiffel tower at night is a copyright violation that could land you with a hefty fine (not that it’s stopped the selfie-snapping masses, of course).


How Far Companies Will Go To Protect You From Copyright Bullies

When somebody wants to silence speech, they often use the quickest method available. When the speech is hosted on a major online platform, that method is usually a copyright or trademark complaint.


Warner Bros. Fights Piracy With An Army Of Bots That Mimic Humans

Thanks to an $US80 million lawsuit between Hotfile and the MPAA, a judge just ordered Warner Brothers to unseal records that explained the inner workings of their super secretive system to takedown pirated content. Now, the secret’s out, and the secret is “robots.”


How The Pirate Bay's Clever Hardware Setup Keeps The Site Alive

Various countries and corporations have been trying to shut down the Pirate Bay for years, and yet, the site keep soldiering on. This is not an accident. It’s actually the result of an ingenious cloud-based hardware setup that’s spread all over the world and more or less bulletproof.


This Is How Hollywood Wants The Government To Fight Piracy In Australia

Crikey got hold of a response paper from Hollywood studios to the government’s proposed crackdown on copyright infringement. It’s not exactly a surprising paper, except that it’s surprisingly aggressive.