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Thanks To PETA, The Monkey Selfie Controversy Will Never End 

PETA, the same organisation that launched a bogus porn site and hates humans, is getting embroiled in one of the most click-baiting copyright battles of the century: The case of the monkey selfie.

Judge Rules That Porn Companies Blackmailing Pirates Is Not OK

Sending threatening letters is a storied tactic for companies trying to get money from alleged pirates, by this stage. But spying on people and trying to subpoena their neighbours? Not so kosher, at least according to one federal judge in the US.

Why Winning The Dancing Baby Lawsuit Is A Big Deal For The Internet

In 2007, a home video of a baby dancing to Prince’s 1984 masterpiece Let’s Go Crazy was uploaded onto YouTube. Eight years and a few dozen lawyers later, a federal appeals court has ruled that uploading the video was an OK thing to do — a judgement that is of surprising importance to the rest of the internet.

Ashley Madison Is Sending Out Bogus DMCA Takedown Notices

Copyright law is complicated, but one thing is clear: The Digital Millennium Copyright Law was not designed to enable censorship. Unfortunately, the owners of Ashley Madison are using — and abusing — DMCA takedown notices to do just that in order to keep its hacked data off the web.

Twitter Is Using Copyright Law To Bust Joke Thieves

Imitation is supposed to be the sincerest form of flattery, but for comedians on Twitter it’s a pain in the arse. Joke theft is rampant, with “parody” accounts and spambots racking up thousands of followers by tweeting stolen jokes as their own. But now Twitter is helping people bust joke-stealers.

The Government's Copyright Infringement Report Has Problems With The Word 'Illegal'

A report on online copyright infringement prepared for and published by the Department of Communications says that almost half of all Australian internet users (above the age of 12, currently consuming online media) either downloaded or streamed movies, music, TV or video games “illegally” in the first quarter of this year.

Those numbers taken at face value are stunning, and point to widespread and endemic illegitimate copyright infringement by Aussie ‘net users, and flagrant disregard for the rights of intellectual property holders.

The report has serious issues, though, including the rampant use of the word “illegal”.

Sketchy Israeli Company Uses Copyright Law As An Intimidation Tactic 

An Israeli company called Flash Network is fighting dirty against people who called it out for sneaky javascript injections. It’s a prime example how companies use copyright laws to threaten and intimidate anyone who criticises them.

Preserving Video Games: Another Thing The DMCA Is Screwing Up

The Digital Millenium Copyright Act is the most fundamental piece of US legislation underpinning digital rights. It’s also woefully broken, with its wide-reaching language being used to strong-arm researchers and make tinkering with your own smartphone illegal. The latest trick? Screwing over anyone who wants to preserve video games.

You Might Not Get Fined For Downloading Dallas Buyers Club

Dallas Buyers Club pirates and torrenters, there may be a shining light at the end of the dark tunnel ahead of you. The studio behind the movie — and the recent court case against iiNet — has suggested that you might not necessarily be up for a four- or five-figure settlement fee for your illegitimate download.

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