World's Best Top Gear Forum Hit With DMCA Notice To Take Down Links To Episodes

If you’ve ever wanted to stream an episode of Top Gear, Top Gear Australia or Top Gear US online, you’ve probably swung by the FinalGear forums. As of last week, however, the website will no longer be linking to episodes of the world’s favourite car show following a takedown notice under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.


RIAA Bullies Tiny Music Sites That Pay Fees Instead Of Make Money

We’ve known for years that the RIAA acts like a bunch of hypocritical bullies with nothing better to do than pick on the helpless. But wow. The latest report about how the lobbying organisation is now bullying small music sites that not only have zero revenue but also pay licensing fees is just pathetic.


Huge Scam Sends 30,000 Fake Copyright Notices Containing Trojans

TorrentFreak reports that in recent days some 30,000 fake copyright infringement notices demanding cash settlements have been circulating in Germany. In addition to defrauding unwitting folks out of cash, the notices also come bundled with malicious software designed to steal personal info.


Piracy Is Bad: Australian Animation Studio Boss Wants To Educate Kids

The CEO of Australian animation production company Animal Logic wants to teach children that illegal movie downloading is no different to shoplifting, saying that by the time they’re in high school it’s too late to change their attitudes towards copyright infringement.


So Long, Open Web: Mozilla Accepts Closed Source DRM And We All Lose

It’s official: the last holdout for the open web has fallen. Flanked on all sides by Google, Microsoft, Opera, and (it appears) Safari’s support and promotion of the EME DRM-in-HTML standard, Mozilla is giving in to pressure from Hollywood, Netflix, et al, and will be implementing its own third-party version of DRM. It will be rolled out in Desktop Firefox later this year.


How DRM Harms Our Computer Security

DRM and the laws that back it up actively undermine our computer security. On this Day Against DRM, the first one since we learned about the US government’s efforts to sabotage the integrity of our cryptography and security technology, it’s more important than ever to consider how the unintended consequences of copyright enforcement make us all less safe.


Stop The Pirates: Behind George Brandis' Copyright Campaign

Copyright has been firmly back on the agenda in recent months. We’ve seen the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) release its report on copyright which recommended that Australia adopt a “fair use” exception to copyright infringement. Yet we’ve also seen the Attorney General, George Brandis, get more exercised about copyright piracy, and pledge to do something to address it. But why?


Should Copyright Law Also Cover Hyperlinks?

The US Copyright Office recently proposed a seemingly small addition to copyright law that bears some huge implications. It wants to enable copyright holders to protect unauthorised versions of their work from hyperlinks. You read that right: It could soon be illegal simply to link to certain content.


Australia's Attorney-General Ready To Target ISPs Over Copyright Infringement

George Brandis, the Australian Government’s Attorney-General and Minister for the Arts, is gearing up for a renewed assault on ISPs that “enable” piracy and copyright infringement. After a speech two weeks ago at the Copyright Law forum, Brandis is sowing the seeds for a crackdown on Internet businesses that don’t punish their users for sharing copyrighted content.


Massive Government-Led Australian Piracy Crackdown On The Way

The Government hates piracy, and Attorney-General George Brandis is the man in Canberra who wants it gone from our shores. And from the looks of things, he’ll throw just about every weapon he has at the problem until it goes away, including three-strikes programs for those caught downloading content and a requirement for ISPs to potentially “take down” websites hosting infringing content. Brace yourselves: a crackdown is coming.