Tagged With construction

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Video: Building a floating city also known as an aircraft carrier is hard as hell to do because the numbers are basically unfathomable. A basic aircraft carrier is made of 60,000 tonnes of steel, 4.5 acres of non-skid surface with four 100m catapults. The whole thing weighs 90.7 million kilograms and takes five years to build and - get this - costs $US5 billion ($6.5 billion) at the very least. It's a massive undertaking.

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Video: Tall buildings often have tuned mass dampers hidden inside their structures to stabilise them against the wind. Those tuned mass dampers are huge and heavy and help limit a building's movement by swaying in the opposite direction of the building. That is, if the wind is making a skyscraper sway to the right, the damper will sway to the left to dissipate the kinetic energy, and reduce the, um, swaying. What's interesting is that the Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building, doesn't have that.

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Video: Seeing a train get assembled is a lot like watching someone play with LEGO bricks, only if that someone was God and the LEGO bricks were stupidly ginormous. This timelapse of a London Elizabeth line train being built out at Bombardier in Derby is especially cool because it seems like pieces and parts are just flying together.

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Video: There are so many dump trucks, pavers and road rollers paving Moscow's Tverskaya Street in this time lapse that it looks like a massive swarm of machines have taken over Russia. The smaller road rollers look and move a lot like the little planes that launch from the mothership (which, in this case would be the dump trucks).

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Cruise ships are basically giant floating cities. How do you build a giant floating city? Well, it's pretty much like playing with Lego bricks. This time lapse shows the construction process of building AIDA Cruises' new flagship in Nagasaki: the AIDAprima. The AIDAprima can hold up to 3,300 passengers with 900 crew members and is nearly 304.80m long. The ship cost $US645 ($872) million to build and seeing it get put together almost makes it worth the sticker price.

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Two hours outside of Paris stands Guédelon, a castle that looks like it's from the medieval period, but is actually being constructed right now. What's more, the castle isn't being built with new technology but instead with medieval techniques and materials. That means every stone, every tile, every single part of the castle is assembled as it would have been hundreds of years ago.

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Any type of tree house rules. Throw a shanty on a tree trunk and the world immediately becomes a beautiful place. This tree house, though? This tree house is legitimately awesome. In the woods and next to the water, it has a bridge, windows, a deck, and basically everything you ever wanted in a tree house.

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The world's first 3D printed office building has opened in Dubai, as part of a push to make Dubai and the UAE a world leader in the 3D printing industry. The one-storey, 250 square metre building is just a prototype for a further program, but it is the first of its kind that has been fully equipped and is able to be used as a functional office building.

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Video: Sumo is a sport that is steeped in tradition, so it shouldn't be a surprise that making the Dohyo, or sumo wrestling ring, is a painstaking process that requires many different tools, people and methods. I can't count how many steps there are in the process of shaping clay and rope into a ring fit for Sumo wrestlers. The transformation from a pile of dirt into a solid, shiny and intricate circle is basically art.

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Video: Yeah, I'm not ashamed to admit this: I feel slightly less comfortable when I'm under a tunnel than when I'm not. It's not that I think that the tunnel will collapse on me - it's because I know the sky absolutely won't. This tunnel would put my fear into overdrive because it looks like it would totally collapse. It has no permanent support work and the entire construction process looks like piecing together Lego bricks. Yet it can support so much weight and still stand up.

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Watching a 63-storey Dubai hotel explode into flames on New Year's Eve and smolder well into New Year's Day, you might've been wondering the same thing I was: Why do so many of Dubai's skyscrapers catch fire? And how terrifying is it that this city can't seem to stop this from happening?