Tagged With climate

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The British Antarctic Survey has a problem in the form of an enormous crack in the East Antarctic ice sheet. Dormant for about 35 years, The Crack began to grow in 2012. Today, it threatens to cleave off the entire ice shelf supporting the Halley VI research station. And so, Halley VI is being towed out of harm's way.

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Trump may never remove that dumb tweet about climate change being a Chinese hoax, but there are signs that the US president-elect is warming up to the notion that maybe — just maybe! — global warming isn't a liberal conspiracy. The latest signal came on Monday, when Trump met with former US presidential candidate and noted climate activist Al Gore to discuss our ever-warming planet. 

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An estimated 20 billion barrels of oil valued at up to $US900 billion ($1.2 trillion) has been discovered in a West Texan shale formation, the US Geological Survey announced this week. Three times the size of the Bakken oilfields in North Dakota, it could be the largest such deposit ever assessed in the United States.

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Seabird poop: Good for ruining your picnic at the beach, and apparently good for keeping the Arctic cool, too. But if the birds want to stop their summertime home from melting away, they're going to have to start taking laxatives.

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It teased us with the possibility of a no-show, but a weak La Niña has officially arrived, according to NOAA. Parts of the northern United States can expect a cooler and wetter-than-average winter, while southern California, unfortunately, can expect more drought.

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Welcome to the future. A future that me, and many people who put their faith in science, have been staring at in bewilderment, denial and abject terror for the better part of a year.

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It isn't enough to halt global warming, but carbon-hungry plants are helping impede the buildup of CO2 in our atmosphere to a measurable degree, a new study has found. While this is a good thing and you should go thank a tree right now, the effect is probably temporary, speaking to how damn complicated our planet's response to climate change is going to be.

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On an forbidding shoreline at the bottom of the world, the prodigious ice sheets of West Antarctica dead-end in the Amundsen sea. For decades, scientists have been monitoring this interface of rock, ice and ocean in order to understand how quickly it will retreat as the planet warms up. A new study shows that three of the Amundsen sea's frozen gateways are melting away faster than we realised, raising the spectre of an ice sheet collapse that could trigger a metre of global sea level rise.

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For the first time in human history, atmospheric CO2 concentrations exceeded 400 parts per million (ppm) in 2015. They're expected to do so again this year, and every subsequent year for many generations to come, according to a new report issued by the World Meteorological Organisation.

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It's only October, but that doesn't seem to matter: NASA is basically sure 2016 will go down as the hottest year in recorded history. Unless a rogue planet suddenly appears to fling the Earth off its present orbit and into the Kuiper Belt, we're locked in. Welcome to life in a rapidly warming world.

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Last week, the Paris climate agreement cleared its final hurdle, when the European Union formally signed on. With the support of 73 nations accounting for 57 per cent of global carbon emissions, the deal enters legal force on November 4. So what does that mean, and how soon do we kick our addiction to fossil fuels?

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If you're planning to live in the Big Apple for the foreseeable future, it's time to invest in flood insurance and a gondola. A new study finds that 2.7m floods, like those produced by Hurricane Sandy, will be three to 17 times more frequent by the end of the century, thanks to sea level rise and shifting storm conditions.