cities

7 Big Ways Cities Have Transformed Themselves For Bikes

The number of bikes in our cities is increasing, and with that increase we’re also seeing some major changes in the way cities are designed. Engineers are giving bikes their own bridges, tunnels, overpasses, even escalators, making biking feel like it’s an essential, permanent part of the city.


The Lattice Of Tubes Covering This Building Are A Natural AC System

If you have ever sweated through a summer in the city, you can thank those skyscrapers all around. Tall buildings trap heat that create urban heat islands. But what if you could create a building that cools the city instead? A building skin made of a series of tubes with evaporating rainwater can do just that.


Why No One Bothers Putting Apostrophes In 'Don't Walk' Signs

No one is sure when exactly the first WALK/DONT WALK style signs were installed. Even the Federal Highway Administration isn’t sure, though it is thought that the first such sign was likely installed sometime in the early to mid-1930s.


Why Google Is So Interested In Kenya's Public Transport System

The thousands of graphics-covered minibuses called matatus that zip through Nairobi make up one of the largest (and liveliest) informal transportation systems in the world. This unregulated — some might say renegade — transit keeps the city moving rather efficiently, and, until recently, was an all-cash business. Until Google stepped in.


6 Buildings Competing For The UK's Top Architecture Prize

The Stirling Prize is one of the most prestigious of all architecture awards. Named for the great British architect James Stirling, the prize is given annually from the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) to a single building that has made the greatest contribution to British architecture. The shortlist has just been announced.


These Are The 11 Most Endangered Places In The United States

Americans tend not to be too nostalgic when it comes to their past — but in some cases it’s resulted in the loss of priceless pieces of history. That’s why the National Trust for Historic Preservation puts out a “most endangered” list of important building and places that aren’t long for this world — unless someone takes notice.


See How Much Of New York City A Taxi Driver Sees In A Single Day

Everybody’s wondered what it’s like to be a taxi driver. Whether riding in the back of a cab contemplating your existence or watching a Robert De Niro movie, we’ve all contemplated how many passengers it takes to make a day’s wages. Now, thanks to some clever code, you can watch it play out before your very eyes.


How More Bike Parking Could Make Cities Better For Everyone

Car parking remains a major part of our economy, and it is easy to realise why its availability and low price are clung to so fiercely. Parking allows access for customers to stores, employees to work, entrepreneurs to meetings, tourists to places where they can deposit all their money, the needy to services, residents to their homes. Because of this, it’s harder to see that the costs are so high that they outweigh all economic benefits provided.


Inside The Secret Building Bringing Mobile Phone Service To New York City's Subway System

As Hurricane Sandy revealed almost two years ago, New York’s 100-year-old subway is not a modern and robust system. In fact, compared to other cities, it’s downright dirty, unpredictable and technologically behind. But the Metro Transit Authority is currently dragging it into the future — and I got the chance to go behind the scenes of the MTA’s mission.


How Vacant World Cup Stadiums Could Be Turned Into Housing

The World Cup ends this weekend, leaving Brazil with the heady task of deciding what, exactly, to do with the 12 stadiums that were built or converted for games. Two architects have published a proposal to convert the stadiums into something Brazil desperately needs: Affordable housing.