Tagged With chrome

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You can imagine that back in August 2011, when a user requested support for the lossless audio format FLAC in Chrome, it didn't shoot to the top of Google's list of critical features to implement. But that was five years ago. It's only with Chrome 56, the browser's next major revision, that FLAC will be playable natively.

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Chrome might be the default browser for the internet at large, but it's not the only one. And it's also not without its frustrations. Chrome - at least until the most recent update - had a habit for using a metric ton of RAM. It wasn't the de facto king of speed. And the odd tab crashing was enough to cause many a pegged stress ball.

In my fury, I did the unthinkable: I switched to the devil himself, Microsoft Edge. And I persisted for a whole week, migrating my whole workflow to the world of Microsoft. It only lasted a week, and came to a swift end when I'd finally had my fill of the things Edge couldn't do.

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The second you log onto the internet, you start leaving a trace that's more telling than you think. Browsers can not only identify where you are in the world, but they collect a ton of other data too, such as where your mouse is hovering and when you launch a private browser window. Here's a way to find out exactly what you're leaking.

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Google doesn't just want the Chrome browser dominating laptops and desktops of this world, it wants it on as many mobile devices as possible too. If you have Chrome installed on your iPhone or Android, there are a handful of ways you can make it even better than the default settings. Here's how to make sure you're getting the most from the Chrome browser on your mobile devices.

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In a rush to get through all the episodes of Luke Cage? Way behind your partner on seasons of House of Cards? You can get through your Netflix queue faster than normal and save yourself some time, as long as you're prepared to do a little bit of under-the-hood tinkering in your browser.

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Chromebooks may have started life as very basic laptops that were useless without an internet connection, but they have become more powerful and more useful with each passing year. Now, not only is it possible to run Linux on your Chromebook, you can access the operating system through a browser window.

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When Chromebooks launched in the winter of 2011, they seemed destined to fail, much like the underpowered, internet-dependent netbooks that came before them. But in the five years since, Chromebooks have defied expectations, becoming the most used device in US classrooms and even outselling Macs for the first time this year. Still, people complain about their inability to run useful software, but that's all about to change.

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When Chrome OS first appeared, it was practically useless without an internet connection. Now, an offline Chromebook is no longer the functionless brick it once was because there are dozens of web apps with offline capabilities. Here's everything you can do today on Chrome OS without online access.

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Eager to try out Chrome OS, but not ready to ditch Windows entirely? Thanks to the latest software package from Neverware, you can have both. By installing the company's CloudReady software, you can turn your Windows laptop into a Chromebook, and it's also possible to set up a dual-boot system using both operating systems.

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It's once again time to learn about all the fun things Google's planning for the next year. Google I/O 2016, which starts on May 18, will be the company's first developer conference under Alphabet, and this time around, Android likely won't be the major focus of the big announcements — at least not the Android on your smartphone.