Tagged With cell phones

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MIT's self-assembly lab has created mobile phones that build themselves, in a manner of speaking. There's no fancy nano- or bio- technology involved, nothing theoretical or suggestive of a near-future Singularity. It's devilishly simple, because the whole project boils down to throwing phone parts into a rock tumbler.

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You wouldn't know an interceptor from an ordinary mobile phone tower, there's no way you can. Except that when your phone connects to one, a variety of over-the-air attacks become possible — everything from eavesdropping to pushing spyware on the device. It all happens stealthily, silently.

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Rocks mined from the seafloor have been confirmed as a viable source for rare earth metals, and thus a tiny piece of the ocean might soon find its way into a cell phone or computer chipboard near you. The finding, published in the April 2014 issue of Applied Geochemistry, all but guarantees a new round of focus on overcoming the challenges — both industrial and environmental — of extracting mineral riches from the ocean depths.

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Bearing in mind that CNN is the same network that suggested Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 might have flown into a black hole, it was nonetheless interesting to hear the network speculate that the mobile phones of the flight's passengers might hold an archive of unsent emails, texts, photos, and videos of whatever sequence of events befell the doomed airliner — and that these fragile digital files could still be recovered.

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One of the great mysteries of life, along with who framed Roger Rabbit and like, what's included under the umbrella term of global warming, is why can't we use our dang phones and other electronics on a freaking aeroplane. It's as if some dimwit who was past his prime decades ago decided when cell phones became popular that electronics were devil tools that existed for the sole purpose to bring down planes. We all realised years ago that our electronics won't do much to a plane. And yet no one has come up with a better explanation.

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Nokia just unveiled the Lumia 925 — and it's the Windows phone that you'll want. Gone is the all-plastic traditional Lumia, subsumed by a much more refined feeling metal-polycarbonate mix. This thing looks and feels great.