Tagged With bullets

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Video: Please don't ever do this at home. Or do this anywhere, really. Mixing bullets with molten aluminium creates a helluva explosion — but it sprays the hot liquid metal everywhere, and that's just a terrible idea. Plus, it's guaranteed to end in fire and blood. Instead, watch the Backyard Scientist do it.

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Video: Wow. Let's never ever be on this end of a gun barrel in real life, but seeing the slug shoot out from this homemade quad barrel shotgun is really, really impressive. The homemade weapon is pure insanity — like something only fit for a comic book villain — because its four shotgun barrels in one. Seeing it fire in slow motion is unreal. You can basically see the bullet dance in the air.

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Video: No one should ever have to face the other end of a gun barrel. But if you find yourself in such a situation, let's all hope that it's underwater. Here's our favourite physicist Andreas Wahl proving how the velocity of a bullet slows down like crazy when it's fired underwater with a lovely visual experiment. The bullet nosedives after getting shot and only travels about a metre. If you're more than like 2m away from the rifle, you'd be fine.

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Video: Titanium is strong, super light and has a cool name, but is it bulletproof? Demolition Ranch tries to puncture a hole in a 3cm thick titanium plate by shooting different calibre bullets and guns at it, and the results are pretty impressive. The titanium plate can withstand little pellet guns all the way up to huge arse armour piercing .50 cal black tip bullets. Titanium, very impressive.

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Video: f you were a child once upon a time, you may have remembered Bugs Bunny cleverly stuffing Elmer Fudd's shotgun with a carrot so that when Fudd fired his shotgun, it would explode in his face. But would that actually happen if you did that in real life? Demolition Ranch, answerer of life's questions about weapons, tests out that infamous cartoon scenario and finds that the carrot doesn't stop the shotgun slug at all (it still shoots fine), it just destroys the barrel of the gun in the process.

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Video: Bowling balls are strong and dense and basically indestructible. Well, that's until you start hitting them with different calibre bullets just to see what will happen. A .22 calibre bullet from a pistol barely even dents the bowling ball while a .50 BMG incendiary round impossibly shreds it in half. Demolition Ranch fired so many kinds of bullets at a bowling ball that you'll never have to wonder again what happens when a bullet hits a bowling ball.

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Video: Reams of paper make for pretty good bullet proof material. It's just layers and layers of protection! But what happens when it's a 50 cal machine gun that's shooting at paper? How many reams does it take to stop that ridiculously giant and powerful bullet? About 7! Which is like, 3500 sheets of paper.

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Video: Jiggle, jiggle, jiggle. That's what it looks like from afar when a fully automatic glock starts shooting its bullets at the ballistic gel dummy. And it's almost funny how the gel moves! But then you look a little closer and see the true damage of the gun and it's a whole lot scarier. The bullets spread open upon impact with the gel for maximum damage and then basically torpedoes itself into such spiraling damage that it's so very frightening.

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Wow. Ten thousand wows couldn't even begin to explain how much amazement and pure jaw dropping wonder that I'm feeling after seeing a gun fire off a shot at 73,000 frames per second. We've seen bullets and other guns get shot in slow motion before but not anything like this, the visible force and pressure and explosion and dance of fire and ghost of a bullet trail and mini mushroom cloud that we get to see is just simply incredible. The detail, man.

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The long range rifle has been around since the 19th century, a short 100 years after Daniel Bernoulli published his book, Hydrodynamica, on the relationship between pressure and potential energy (or speed) of a fluid. The gist of his principle relates an increase in speed of a fluid to a decrease in pressure. Using this with the venturi effect that states the velocity of a fluid increases as the cross sectional area decreases provides the key to projectile ballistics.