Tagged With biology

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It feels like just last week the majestic giraffe finally had its moment in the spotlight. Wait, that was last week. At long last, the world's tallest land mammals are getting the respect they deserve. Except, because everything we humans love we somehow destroy, giraffes are now dying.

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A new study from the University of Vienna, Austria, suggests that Cesarean sections are changing the trajectory of human evolution, altering physical characteristics in both mothers and babies. Trouble is, the researchers presented virtually no empirical evidence to support their extraordinary claim, and the credulous media simply took it at face-value.

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In case you thought we'd figured out life in the oceans even a little bit, a new study published in Nature Communications sets the record straight. For the first time, scientists have found experimental evidence of underwater pollination. There are bees in the sea — or at least creatures that perform the same kind of work.

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Astronauts who return to Earth after long-duration space missions suffer from untreatable nearsightedness. Scientists have now isolated the cause, but finding a solution to the problem will prove easier said than done.

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Speculation has emerged in recent years that young blood can reverse the ageing process, raising the prospect of an exciting new rejuvenation technique. A new study contradicts this claim, pointing to other factors that may be responsible for the perceived anti-ageing effects of youthful blood.

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This microscopic diplonemid doesn't look like much, but it's one of the most abundant single-celled hunters in the ocean. Researchers from the University of British Columbia have become the first to identify and photograph this surprisingly elusive — but ecologically important — sea creature.

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Scientists have learned that upwards of 25 per cent of all people who become infected with Ebola show none of the typical symptoms. The finding suggests the recent West African Ebola Epidemic was more widespread than previously thought, and that new methods need to be developed to diagnose and contain the dreaded virus during an outbreak.

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A team of biologists has just named three new salamanders in the genus Thorius; the tiniest tailed tetrapods known to science. Smaller than a matchstick, these creatures are as strange as they are adorable, their miniaturised anatomy pushing the boundaries of what natural selection can produce. Tragically, all three species appear to be edging toward extinction.