Tagged With aquos

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Electronics manufacturers, if you insist on releasing 100 infinitesimally differing televisions, camcorders or back shavers, take a cue from Sharp. They laid out their entire new DX2 line (LCD TVs with integrated Blu-ray) in one handy graphic.

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Sharp has unveiled a stunning 26-foot-tall Christmas tree made of 43 Aquos LCD televisions, which sizes ranging from 19 to 52 inches. The gigantic TV tree is located in New York's Grand Central Station, where people can not only admire its coordinated decoration animations, created by Japanese video artist Tsuyoshi Takashiro, but also register to win one of the Aquos panels in the tree. If you are a New Yorker and need another reason to go to Grand Central, Sharp will also donate one dollar per registered person to a program that trains people in environmental jobs.

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It's not available in the US, but Softbank customers will be able to snag the Aquos Fulltouch 931SH. It may look a lot like the iPhone, but this phone packs slide-out QWERTY along with a 3.8-inch touchscreen running at a crazy 1024x480 resolution. Not only is that as sharp as the HTC Touch HD—it's super wide screen, ready for 16x9 content. Of course the 931SH packs all sorts of other goodies, including a 1seg tuner and 5MP camera. But why should we tempt you more over something you cannot buy?

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If you're in the market for a new television and a Blu-Ray player, Sharp will help you kill two birds with one of its new Aquos DXs. The company has released a line of LCD TVs that have built-in Blu-Ray disc recorders, which they tout as an all-in-one solution for recording television onto BDs... in case there's television that's actually worth the trouble. The 16 sets in the Aquos DX line range from 26-inch to 52-inch models and cost between $US1,600 and $US4,900.

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There's so much wrong with the application of this technology that we won't even get started on it, but this Sharp television runs off the juice of a single attached solar panel. That's because the 52" LCD is illuminated by LEDs which coincidentally reduces its power draw to the same amount produced by that solar panel sitting on the floor.

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Much like Master/Blaster, the Mad Max villain which consisted of a gigantic retarded guy with a smart little midget on its back, the Sharp Aquos BD-HDv22 combines the smart and the stupid in one bulky package. How so? Well, it's a combination of a Blu-ray player/recorder and a VHS player/recorder. No, not DVD, VHS. You know, just in case you want to convert your collection of movies taped off HBO from the early 90s you have in a box in your basement to Blu-ray. How much will this monstrosity cost you, what with its decades-spanning techs brutally crammed together? $US1,100, due to be released on October 20th. I'll take two!

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Whether the Dealzmodo of the Century, a 52-inch Sharp Aquos HDTV for the eye-popping price of US$38.42, was a cockup or just a scammy scam, Amazon is now actively cancelling orders placed with affiliate myOfficeSource, whose Amazon storefront appears to be totally cleared out. So even if you did get your order in before Amazon stopped taking them, don't expect a giant TV to show up at your door. But at least you're not getting charged. Here's the full email:

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Right now, one of the stores at Amazon.com—myOfficeSource—is selling a 52-inch Sharp Aquos 1080P HDTV for US$38.45 (thirty-eight dollars and forty-five cents). That's US$2,261.54 off its list price. New, not refurbished. Obviously, something wrong—or fishy—must be happening because, right now, you can buy a bunch of products with this discount. Giz reader Cliff, who gave us the heads up, actually bought the 52-inch Aquos and got a confirmation email from Amazon in which they say his order will arrive in mid-september. Update: One reader is giving a word of caution, so proceed with caution because this may be an scam.

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Last week we mentioned a "premium" TV from Sharp (while talking about the XS1) that appeared to be destined for European shores: now there's news that the D65 is coming to the US too. The D65U range has 1080p resolution, and will come in sizes between 42- and 52-inches. The HDTVs will have a 6ms response time, Sharp's Advanced Super View and Black TFT Panel tech, and will apparently be very energy-efficient, through its dynamic back-lighting and contrast system which also reduces power consumption. Standard connectivity is supplemented with five HDMI inputs. Available in October, the 42-inch will be priced at US$1,600, the 46-inch for US$1,900 and the 52-inch version for US$2400.