Tagged With apollo

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A team of scientists has finished analysing rocks collected by the Chinese lunar rover Yutu in 2013 — the first geologic sampling effort to hit the Moon in forty years. The regolith is unlike any we've seen before, and it suggests that the Moon's history is far more complex than we realised.

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Video: The Project Apollo Archive on Flickr is truly one of the great treasures available on the Internet. You can easily get lost in the stunning imagery and wonder about what exists beyond our world. It's also an incredible resource for artists to turn those static pictures into gorgeous videos with 3D effects. My jaw is agage in total awe of this video, Apollo, which shows the magnificence of space travel. We have to go back.

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When we see new images showing how NASA is moving ahead with their Orion Program there is often a Project Apollo feeling, because of the similarities between the two US space mission. This new photo gives us such dejà vu too.

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Tarps can be lighter and even stronger than tents. But, they can also be a pain to setup, expose you to the cold, damp ground and don't protect you from bugs. With its new ultralight bicycle camping (or anything, really) series, Nemo has fixed all those problems. Here's how.

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Calling for 'international investigations' into the 'murky' details surrounding the Apollo Moon missions is normally the preserve of 4chan and tinfoil hat-wearers. But now, you can add Russian Investigative Commission spokesperson Vladimir Markin to that illustrious list.

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When Apollo astronauts landed on the moon, they left flags and footprints, yes, but also dozens of scientific instruments. Among them was a network of seismometers originally meant to study moonquakes. Forty years later, data from these seismometers are still helping physicists understand how to detect elusive gravitational waves — a challenge even with our fancy modern technology.

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For a brief period in the American saga, the astronaut was the man of the moment. No profession commanded as much awe and admiration. Widely regarded as the personification of all that was best in the country, the first astronauts were blanketed with the adulation usually accorded star quarterbacks, war heroes, and charismatic movie stars. Yet this was never part of NASA's agenda.