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Oh God, Another Olympic Pool Turned Green

Less than 24 hours after Olympic onlookers watched the Rio diving pool turn a murky shade of green, it now looks like the water polo pool is slowly growing something, too.

Officials Don't Know Why The Olympic Diving Pool Turned Green (Also: Gross)

As the women’s synchronised diving teams took to the pool in Rio de Janeiro today, they were greeted by a strange sight. The diving pool had turned green overnight, while the neighbouring water polo pool remained a crystal clear blue. This confused the Olympic organisers, media, and the internet profusely. Long story short: It’s most likely an algae bloom.

Why Did This Lake Suddenly Turn Blood Red?

Three months ago, Iran’s Lake Urmia was green. Today, it’s blood red. But it’s not something that’s been added to the lake that caused the change — it’s something that’s been taken out.

Florida's Slime Coast Is A State-Sponsored Disaster

Image: Maddie Stone The smell hit me as soon as I opened my car door — like rancid milk mixed with dog shit. I gasped for breath as humid air descended, filling my pores with the putrid odor.

El Niño Just Made That Mysterious Warm Blob In The Ocean Disappear

Two years ago, a huge, inexplicable hot patch of water appeared in the Pacific Ocean, and stayed right through the seasons — until now. Referred to among scientists as “the Blob”, it’s finally gone away, taken by El Niño. It may only be a matter of time, though, before the Blob lives again.

Why Algae Could Be The Greatest, And Trickiest, Fuel Source Of All

From powering aeroplanes to replacing nuclear energy, algae has been touted as a green energy miracle. So if our waterways are already filled with the stuff, why isn’t it filling the world’s skies with biofueled planes? Algae is a tricky creature that presents a lot of challenges and misconceptions. Here’s why it’s difficult to harness — and why it could big a big payoff.

In The Future, International Airline Travel Will Actually Be Fun Again

Travelling abroad is inherently thrilling — but then there’s that interminable, soul-sucking trek to get there. In the future, things might be very different.

The Key To Colonizing Mars Could Be These Tiny Green Microbes

Long ago, a clan of hardy microbes called cyanobacteria helped terraform the lifeless Earth into a vibrant biosphere. Today, the very same critters could be the key to colonizing Mars.

Fuel Made From Algae Could Help Fukushima -- And The Rest Of The World

In the ongoing search for a non-nuclear energy, Fukushima could find a partial answer in living, green, microalgae. And algae can help the rest of the world, too.

Get Lost In The Swirling Green Seas Of A Massive Algae Bloom

The image above, “Eye of an Algal Storm” was captured by the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-2A satellite over the middle of the Baltic Sea on 7 August. With a spatial resolution of just 10 metres, ripples and waves are captured in stunning detail. In the top centre of the image, you can even make out the wake of a ship as it slices through cyanobacteria-laden waters.

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