agriculture
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Chernobyl's Milk Is Still Radioactive, 30 Years After The Meltdown

It’s been 30 years since the Chernobyl disaster and radiation levels in plants seemed to have died down. So why are levels of radiation in milk still peaking?


These Three New GM Crops Will Change How We Farm

Scientists have created three new genetically modified crops to combat three of the world’s most troubling crop diseases. Each was tweaked in a slightly different way to be resistant to those specific diseases. The details appear in three new papers out today in Nature Biotechnology.


The Number Of GMOs Worldwide Just Dropped For The First Time In Two Decades

For the past two decades, the number of genetically-modified crops has been steadily skyrocketing around the globe. Until 2015, when the number saw its first recorded drop. What’s going on?


How To Tell If A Drought Is Going To Kill Off Your Trees

Droughts are hitting us harder, and they’re only going to keep on coming. But how do you know if your trees can make it through a severe drought? Now there’s a way to find out before the drought hits.


Why The US Government Says It Doesn't Need To Regulate This Mutant Mushroom

A mushroom that’s resistant to browning has become the first CRISPR-edited food to get green lit by the US government. Here’s how this mutated fungus managed to escape USDA oversight — and why this agency needs to upgrade its regulatory guidelines.


Saudi Arabia Is Outsourcing Its Drought To California

For the last few years, the drought-stricken nation of Saudi Arabia has been responsibly cracking down on thirsty crops to conserve water. But their cows still need alfalfa, one of the most water-intensive crops around. To solve the problem, Saudi Arabia wants to grow its alfalfa in a land that apparently has plenty of water: California. Wait, what?


El Niño Is Causing A Worldwide Sugar Shortage

El Niño is almost over, but the wreckage of things it knocked over in its wake continues — and one of those things is your sugar supply. Eat your desserts while you still can, friends.


Fukushima Farmers Are Using Soil Made From Polyester

It’s been five years since Japan’s Tohoku earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown in Fukushima — and some consumers are still wary of produce grown in the region. That’s why some farmers aren’t growing plants in soil that might be contaminated — they’re growing plants in polyester instead.


The US Has A 30-Year 'Nitrate Legacy' That No One Wants To Pay For

A new study done by Canadian researchers takes a look at nitrates in ground water in the Mississippi Basin and finds bad news. If the US stops using nitrogen fertilisers today, there will still be a three-decade legacy of excess nitrogen in water — and there’s a lawsuit right now that will decide who will foot the bill.


Botanists Just Answered One Of The Biggest Questions About Farming on Mars

Researchers have successfully grown a crop of tomatoes, peas and radishes harvested in Martian soil — and with those comes an answer to one of the big questions we have about how to farm in space.


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